W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > whatwg@whatwg.org > November 2008

[whatwg] Review of the 3.16 section and the HTMLInputElement interface

From: timeless <timeless@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2008 08:07:29 +0200
Message-ID: <26b395e60811062207g100fea5fqc91ad21d7f8d7066@mail.gmail.com>
On Thu, 6 Nov 2008, Samuel Santos wrote:
> What about allowing the Author to change the control's locale? By doing
> so, the UA can then render the button with the same locale as the
> application without compromising the security.

On Thu, Nov 6, 2008 at 5:50 PM, Ian Hickson <ian at hixie.ch> wrote:
> It seems like browsers should do this already based on the lang=""
> attribute. I recommend asking browser vendors to implement this.

On Thu, Nov 6, 2008 at 8:17 PM, Samuel Santos <samaxes at gmail.com> wrote:
> @lang will definitively fix the problem if browsers are willing to implement
> it.

[Ignoring the fact that Klingon isn't officially supported by Unicode]
as most people don't actually speak Klingon, being able to set the
button label to the Klingon translation will not help our users
(similarly for most other languages). And I will campaign against
this. In an internet cafe, it's somewhat reasonable to assume that the
browser could be configured to support a wide range of languages (in
the bay area this would include Korean among others), on average it's
likely that someone visiting an internet cafe could easily not know
all languages spoken by all likely patrons of the cafe, which means
there are probably a number of languages that a web application could
use which would be effectively equivalent from the user's perspective
to Klingon.

If you'd like a certain user agent to use an icon instead of a label,
file a bug report and perhaps it might be implemented.

I think you'll find that this change is even less welcome for average
web applications, however, I wouldn't be opposed.

currently people think of <input type=file> as:

<div><input type=text> <input type=button></div>

however in some browsers, it's more like:

<div><input type=image><caption for=image /> <input type=button></div>

in the browsers I'm thinking about, the image actually represents the
selected file and iirc button is more of a reset button (the caption
is the file's leaf name).
Received on Thursday, 6 November 2008 22:07:29 UTC

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