W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > whatwg@whatwg.org > August 2008

[whatwg] RDFa Features

From: Kristof Zelechovski <giecrilj@stegny.2a.pl>
Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2008 00:40:26 +0200
Message-ID: <DF757B98AA6B4443AC789B1A7ECDC1E1@POCZTOWIEC>
While Google owns the Web, it is not the core of the Web.  If Google goes
down, Google users cannot use Google any more.  Sure, there are quite a few
of them; but Google is a big fish accordingly.
On the other hand, if Verizon or InterNIC goes down, we have a blackout,
possibly with street riots and people plundering stores.  That shows Verizon
is an authority, Google is not, although, in general, Google is more useful.
I believe in the general sanity in the architecture of the Web.  I keep
asking these questions because I would like it to stay.
Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: Ben Adida [mailto:ben@adida.net] 
Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2008 11:50 PM
To: Tab Atkins Jr.
Cc: Kristof Zelechovski; whatwg at lists.whatwg.org; Manu Sporny
Subject: Re: [whatwg] RDFa Features

Tab Atkins Jr. wrote:
> Consider the question to be asked by me as well.  A host of a popular
> format forgets to maintain its registration and gets squatted by a
> malicious person. They pick up another url to host their schema on, but
> legacy pages are still pointing to the old url and now may have poisoned
> semantics.  Do we have a recourse?

Well, for one, if you've got prefixes, you just need to change where
your prefix points :) So that's kinda nice.

But really, if an authority on some topic gets hacked, what is your
recourse? What happens if Google forgets to renew their domain
registration for one of their subsites (it happens to the best of us)?
There are legal recourses that are beyond this discussion here.

But really it comes down to: do you believe in the general sanity of the
architecture of the Web? I do. It's worked pretty well so far.

-Ben
Received on Thursday, 28 August 2008 15:40:26 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.4.0 : Wednesday, 22 January 2020 16:59:05 UTC