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Re: Plain Language

From: Alastair Campbell <acampbell@nomensa.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Aug 2018 08:54:42 +0000
To: Silver Task Force <public-silver@w3.org>
Message-ID: <E6C14633-9CDA-4247-9C56-DA848D10237B@nomensa.com>
From: "Hall, Charles (DET-MRM)"
[snipped]
> The interesting / compelling thing is that people keep doing what we have tasked ourselves to do – convey accessibility guidelines in plain and simple language. While I know this is obvious, the next compelling point is that these authors who have already done the work should be invited to contribute to prototypes that can be tested.

That’s a good point, and there is a closely related point I hope does not get missed:

For many guidelines a plain-English & concise guideline will not provide the necessary accuracy for developers and policy/legal usage.

There is one of those triangles going on, a web-accessibility guideline can be:

  *   Easy to understand
  *   Concise
  *   Accurate & testable.

Pick any two. (By accurate, I mean it is clear what content it applies to.)

Therefore we need to provide both plain English and technical version perhaps at different levels of the guidance.

For any plain-English guideline you can point to it will have to make huge assumptions about when it is applicable, or spend a lot of words describing the situations.

Do any of the prototypes tackle this aspect yet?

Kind regards,

-Alastair

--

www.nomensa.com<http://www.nomensa.com/> / @alastc


Received on Friday, 24 August 2018 08:55:08 UTC

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