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Re: Geospatial-semantic Exploration on the Move [via Geospatial Semantic Web Community Group]

From: Joshua Lieberman <jlieberman@tumblingwalls.com>
Date: Tue, 9 Jun 2015 10:13:45 -0500
Cc: "Simon.Cox@csiro.au" <Simon.Cox@csiro.au>, "public-sdw-wg@w3.org" <public-sdw-wg@w3.org>
Message-Id: <A8940971-0F5D-46C7-BAE3-8291EAECA968@tumblingwalls.com>
To: Jeremy Tandy <jeremy.tandy@gmail.com>
This issue of personal geographic context has been considered in some detail for augmented reality content discovery (http://ar-discovery.wikia.com/wiki/AR_Discovery_Wiki). AR is even more sensitive to content overload than maps.

Josh

Joshua Lieberman, Ph.D.
Interoperability Engineering Without Barriers
jlieberman*at*tumblingwalls*dot*com
+1 (617) 431-6431

> On Jun 9, 2015, at 09:49, Jeremy Tandy <jeremy.tandy@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> +1 ... nice.
> 
>> On Thu, 4 Jun 2015 at 18:35 <Simon.Cox@csiro.au> wrote:
>> On 1 June 2015 at 16:50, W3C Community Development Team <team-community-process@w3.org> wrote:
>> 
>> A typical tourist scenario is hard to picture without a map. Yet, such a
>> scenario implies you are not familiar with your surroundings and, therefore,
>> often not sure how to find the things that are of interest to you. Typical
>> geospatial browsers will provide you with common exploration tools that will
>> most often include a slippy map combined with keyword search, categorized points
>> of interest (POIs) and a fixed set of filters. But, all of these imply either
>> that you know what it is you’re looking for, or that the preset collection of
>> POIs and criteria will be enough to satisfy your needs. In real life, however,
>> those needs will often be affected by the given context, which is, in turn,
>> dependent on multiple, dynamic factors, such as the place you’re visiting,
>> your mood, interests, background etc. Imagine using your favorite geospatial
>> browser to answer the following question:
>> 
>> “Where are the nearest buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, typical of
>> the Prairie School movement?”
>> 
>> GEM (Geospatial-semantic Exploration on the Move) is the very first geospatial
>> exploration tool that offers a rich mobile experience and overcomes the
>> abovementioned limitations of conventional solutions by exploiting all strengths
>> of the Linked Open Data paradigm, such as built-in semantics in open,
>> crowd-sourced knowledge found in publicly available sources, such as DBpedia,
>> loaded and filtered on-demand, according to user’s needs, in order to prevent
>> maps from overpopulating.
>> 
>> GitHub: https://github.com/GeoKnow/GEM
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> Really nice:
>> 
>> Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KoAdrNiDljU
>> 
>> Can I find this app by searching the android play store?
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ----------
>> 
>> This post sent on Geospatial Semantic Web Community Group
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 'Geospatial-semantic Exploration on the Move'
>> 
>> https://www.w3.org/community/geosemweb/2015/01/24/geospatial-semantic-exploration-on-the-move/
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Learn more about the Geospatial Semantic Web Community Group:
>> 
>> https://www.w3.org/community/geosemweb
>> 
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. 
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>> 
>>  

Received on Tuesday, 9 June 2015 15:14:23 UTC

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