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Re: measuring schema.org impact

From: Kane <etaion@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 5 Sep 2018 11:14:21 +0930
Message-ID: <CAO_Uynki3FruDN8XYHczEaxW5zvbJ6ZD=z1zohndPd7GmmtNrg@mail.gmail.com>
To: alexgarciac@gmail.com
Cc: public-schemaorg@w3.org
Hi Alexander,

1. The Google Search console has a rich snippet filter in performance view
<https://search.google.com/search-console/not-verified?original_url=/search-console/performance/search-analytics?%26sap%3DRICHCARD%26breakdown%3Dsap&original_resource_id>
that you can use to work out
2. Old Google Search Console Structured data report
<https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/structured-data?hl=en> will show
what data google has been able to pull.
3. Thats up to you to determine if it's made an impact.

regards,
Kane Hudson.

On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 at 06:55, Alexander Garcia Castro <alexgarciac@gmail.com>
wrote:

> Hi, this may be a question more coming from my ignorance.
>
> the assumption behind schema.org is that if I publish my data using
> schema.org then it will be more discoverable by google? or is it that
> google will be able to identify some specific facets that fully describe
> the entity being published (a la infobox), or both?
>
> Say that I publish a large dataset with schema.org. then, how do I
> measure that
>
> 1) the effort pays off (more visits? hits to a web page?)
> 2) that it has been crawled by google
> 3) the impact that using schema.org improved something
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Alexander Garcia
> https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Alexander_Garcia
> http://www.usefilm.com/photographer/75943.html
> http://www.linkedin.com/in/alexgarciac
>
>
Received on Wednesday, 5 September 2018 01:44:57 UTC

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