W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-respimg@w3.org > March 2015

Re: Picture Element Explanation.

From: Simon Pieters <simonp@opera.com>
Date: Fri, 06 Mar 2015 11:28:02 +0100
To: "Paul Deschamps" <pdescham49@gmail.com>, "Jason Grigsby" <jason@cloudfour.com>
Cc: "public-respimg@w3.org" <public-respimg@w3.org>
Message-ID: <op.xu2nc0itidj3kv@simons-mbp>
On Thu, 05 Mar 2015 16:30:23 +0100, Jason Grigsby <jason@cloudfour.com>  
wrote:

> In Bruce's article, he quotes Steve Souders as saying that the preloader  
> is
> the "the single biggest performance improvement browsers have ever made".
>
> In the link I provided, Andy Davies talks about how Google saw a 20% and
> Firefox a 19% increase in average page speed after implementing the
> preloader.

To be fair, I think those numbers are not entirely relevant for  
speculatively loading images per se. The biggest performance improvement  
is from speculatively loading other scripts and stylesheets while the HTML  
parser is blocked on loading a script. I'm not aware of comparisons of not  
speculatively loading only images.

But even if you don't load images speculatively, the browser could still  
start loading images when the real parser sees the <img> which can happen  
before CSS has loaded, as in my example in  
https://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-respimg/2015Mar/0043.html  
(there are no scripts in the example and thus nothing is loaded  
speculatively).

If you were to defer image loading until layout is known, it needs to be  
deferred in both the speculative parser *and* when the real parser creates  
the element. Browsers have never waited with loading images until layout  
is known. As can be seen in my example, the best-case scenario would be  
that images pop in 1 RTT after first paint if loading images were to wait  
for layout.

Put another way, the perf regression of the proposal would probably not be  
20% page loading time, but instead having first paint be without any  
images and have images come in 1RTT later.

-- 
Simon Pieters
Opera Software
Received on Friday, 6 March 2015 10:28:34 UTC

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