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mlw-lt-track-ISSUE-51 (too-many-global-rules): There are too many pointer attributes and global rules in general [MLW-LT Standard Draft]

From: MultilingualWeb-LT Working Group Issue Tracker <sysbot+tracker@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2012 14:14:56 +0000
Message-Id: <E1TF40O-0006Ir-5E@tibor.w3.org>
To: public-multilingualweb-lt@w3.org
mlw-lt-track-ISSUE-51 (too-many-global-rules): There are too many pointer attributes and global rules in general [MLW-LT Standard Draft]

http://www.w3.org/International/multilingualweb/lt/track/issues/51

Raised by: Felix Sasaki
On product: MLW-LT Standard Draft

Taken from
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-multilingualweb-lt/2012Sep/0135.html

[
It also seems that some of those examples, and others in the specification (including some of mine probably), are a bit unrealistic from a real-life processing viewpoint.

The idea that we would produce global rules (external or embedded) that use selectors to annotate a XML/HTML5 document seem not very practical. As soon as the document changes (for example a new <p> element is added above the existing one in this examples) the selector points to the wrong paragraph.
In other words, using rules to annotate works if the document is 'read-only'.

The main function of global rules, IMO, is to define stable information about a document, or even better, a type of document.
We started to overload this with Localization Note, where we used rules for non-local annotations.
And now in 2.0 where we have many data categories that are annotations, it seems we routinely assume that annotating a document using global rules and hard coded selectors is just fine. But I think it's often not a viable scenario in real life.
IMO annotations should be local or standoff (a local attribute points to the annotation).

My concern is that people from the HTML WG, and other reviewers, will look at this and wonder about the applicability of ITS.
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Received on Friday, 21 September 2012 14:15:09 UTC

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