W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-multilingualweb-lt@w3.org > July 2012

[ACTION 107] Locale Filter

From: Shaun McCance <shaunm@gnome.org>
Date: Wed, 11 Jul 2012 23:52:09 -0400
To: public-multilingualweb-lt@w3.org
Message-ID: <1342065129.2196.122.camel@recto>
NB: I know I'm supposed to write the text for the Locale Filter
data category, and I thought action 107 was for that, but I now
see it's associated to issue 10, which is different. This is the
proposal for Locale Filter.

----------------------

= Locale Filter

== Definition

The Locale Filter data category specifies that a node is only
applicable to certain locales, or that it is not applicable
to certain locales.

This data category can be used for several purposes, including,
but not limited to:

 * Include a legal notice only in locales for certain regions.
 * Drop editorial notes from all localized output.

The Locale Filter data category is only valid on element nodes,
and associates with each node a filter type and a locale list.
The locale filter type can take the following values:

 * "all": The element is included in all locales.
 * "none": The element is included in no locales.
 * "include": The element is only included in locales in the
   locale list, or sublocales of locales in the locale list.
 * "exclude": The element is included in all languages except
   those in the locale list, or sublocales of locales in the
   locale list.

The locale list is a comma-separated list of locale tags from
BCP 47. The list MAY contain whitespace, which MUST be ignored.
A sublocale is any locale that can be formed only by adding
subtags.

If the locale filter type is "all" or "none", a locale list
SHOULD NOT be provided. If one is, it MUST be ignored. If the
locale filter type is "include" or "exclude", a locale list
SHOULD be provided. If one is not, it MUST default to the
empty list.

== Implementation

The Locale Filter data category can be expressed with global
rules, or locally on an individual element. The information
applies  to the textual content of the element, including
child elements and attributes. The default is that the locale
filter type is "all".

If the Locale Filter data category is specified multiple times
for an element, the normal precedence rules apply, and the value
of the locale list with the highest precedence is applied. The
locale list is not a combination of values from multiple rules.

GLOBAL: The localeFilterRule element contains the following:

 * A required selector attribute. It contains an XPath expression
   which selects the nodes to which this rule applies.
 * A required localeFilterType attribute with the value "all",
   "none", "include", or "exclude".
 * An optional localeFilterList attribute with a comma-separated
   list of locales.

LOCAL: The following local markup is available for the Locale
Filter data category:

 * A localeFilterType attribute with the value "all", "none",
   "include", or "exclude".
 * A localFilterList attribute with a comma-separated list of
   locales.

--------------------
NB: The requirements document uses "positive" and "negative" instead
of "include" and "exclude". I think "include" and "exclude" suggest
the functionality more clearly. I added "all", because that is the
default behavior, and I think it's important for a rule to be able
to reset things to the default.

The requirements document uses a semicolon as a list delimiter rather
than a comma. The example given in section 4.3 of BCP 47 uses commas,
though it doesn't seem to actually specify it. Commas are also used
by the HTTP Accept-Language header. Is there a reason to prefer a
semicolon?
Received on Thursday, 12 July 2012 03:52:33 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.4.0 : Friday, 17 January 2020 16:31:47 UTC