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RE: NNBSP Impact

From: <jrmt@almas.co.jp>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 23:02:48 +0900
To: "'Richard Wordingham'" <richard.wordingham@ntlworld.com>, <public-i18n-mongolian@w3.org>
Cc: <public-i18n-mongolian@w3.org>
Message-ID: <000001d0cd2b$ea2f7190$be8e54b0$@almas.co.jp>
Hi Richard,

> But I would argue that these are not Tibetan characters; they are
Mongolian characters used to transliterate Tibetan characters.
Yes you are right. We are discussing the Mongolian character now. But the
U1880-U1884 is not the Mongolian owns.
It is borrowed from ancient Tibetan script.

> The Unicode Standard contains mistakes, and the code chart for Mongolian
clearly does.  
> I hope to report tonight a set of unarguable mistakes such as the omission
of the glyph for "1820 180C  third form (medial)"; 
> the glyph is missing for many such variants.
> I would say it is probably best to accept what the code chart has done for
U+1883 and U+1884, 
> unless you know of fonts or natural writing that behave differently.
I appreciate your work on this and hope to see the Mongolian . Thanks a lot
for your clarification.
There are no objection on the chart. Go ahead your work.
We are looking forward to find out the correction early and utilize the
standard in early time.

Regards,

Jirimutu
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-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Wordingham [mailto:richard.wordingham@ntlworld.com] 
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2015 8:00 PM
To: public-i18n-mongolian@w3.org
Cc: public-i18n-mongolian@w3.org
Subject: Re: NNBSP Impact

On Sun, 2 Aug 2015 17:58:25 +0900
<jrmt@almas.co.jp> wrote:

> But what I mean
> here "on top of corresponding character" in horizontal writing, still 
> remain "in the top" in the vertical writing mode.
> Because the Chinese
> and Tibetan character will not rotate in vertical writing system 
> actually.

But I would argue that these are not Tibetan characters; they are Mongolian
characters used to transliterate Tibetan characters.

> And I found the U1883 and U1884 is
> also rotated to fit to write in the left side of the Mongolian 
> character. This is mean that these character will be written on the 
> left side of the corresponding character in horizontal writing mode.

The Unicode Standard contains mistakes, and the code chart for Mongolian
clearly does.  I hope to report tonight a set of unarguable mistakes such as
the omission of the glyph for "1820 180C  third form (medial)"; the glyph is
missing for many such variants.

I would say it is probably best to accept what the code chart has done for
U+1883 and U+1884, unless you know of fonts or natural writing that behave
differently.

Richard.
Received on Sunday, 2 August 2015 14:03:15 UTC

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