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RE: NNBSP Impact

From: <jrmt@almas.co.jp>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 2015 15:48:34 +0900
To: "'Andrew West'" <andrewcwest@gmail.com>, <public-i18n-mongolian@w3.org>
Message-ID: <000001d0ccef$404e7cc0$c0eb7640$@almas.co.jp>
Hi Andrew,

I am sorry, this is my misunderstanding of these characters. You are right.
I have just called the ancient Mongolian linguistic expert in Hohhot and reconfirmed with him.
He says these characters are pronunciation changer actually. Some of them is write on the top of the corresponding character,
And some of them are write under the corresponding character. 

For this reason, these character is not the punctuation group. It is the part Mongolian word.
I am not sure if it is proper or not to classify them to ALetter or to Others. 
Maybe it should be classified to Extend or Format ? just my personal consideration now.

Thanks to correct me soon.

Best Regards,

Jirimutu
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-----Original Message-----
From: Andrew West [mailto:andrewcwest@gmail.com] 
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2015 9:28 AM
To: public-i18n-mongolian@w3.org
Subject: Re: NNBSP Impact

On 2 August 2015 at 00:55,  <jrmt@almas.co.jp> wrote:
>
> As my knowledge from ancient Mongolian linguistic expert ,
>
> U1880 - U1884 is punctuation, not the part of Mongolian word.

That is surely not the case.  These characters are special letters corresponding to Tibetan letters that are used for transcribing Sanskrit, and all have a general category of Lo.  1880 (Anusvara) and
1881 (Visarga) are well-known letters, and occur in most Indic scripts; 1882-1884 are used in Kālacakra texts and correspond to special Tibetan superfixed letters (see http://www.unicode.org/L2/L2009/09032-n3568.pdf for some examples in Mongolian and Tibetan).  You may argue whether they are letters or signs, but they are definitely not punctuation marks, and I would expect software to treat them as an integral part of the word they occur in.

Andrew
Received on Sunday, 2 August 2015 06:49:36 UTC

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