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[Bug 11124] consider reducing verbosity when talking about code points

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Fri, 22 Oct 2010 19:09:51 +0000
To: public-html-bugzilla@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1P9Mzv-0005Ls-0n@jessica.w3.org>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=11124

--- Comment #5 from Julian Reschke <julian.reschke@gmx.de> 2010-10-22 19:09:50 UTC ---
(In reply to comment #3)
> (In reply to comment #0)
> > Sets and sequences of code points that appear frequently could be assigned
> > names upfront, see, for instance,
> > <http://greenbytes.de/tech/webdav/rfc5234.html#rfc.section.B.1>.
> 
> I disapprove of the RFC style of giving ad hoc names to Unicode characters. I
> object to using that style in HTML5.

This is not "the" RFC style. There is no single RFC style. It's just an
example.

Also, I should have mentioned that I'm mainly interested in *ASCII* characters;
I have no problem with the spec keeping the level of verbosity for characters
outside the ASCII range.

Finally, calling Carriage Return and Line Feed "CR" and "LF" may be "ad hoc",
but it's certainly something readers understand.

> I want to see the Unicode code point in the U+hhhh notation and the literal
> character inline in the spec prose without indirection. I don't care about the
> UPPERCASE UNICODE NAME, but what's in the spec now works for me.

I think getting rid of the UPPERCASE UNICODE NAME (move it into title
attribute, or make it a link?) would be a vast improvement.

That being said, I'd like to understand why you think it's a bad idea to define
once for all a few sets, such as DIGIT, ALPHA or HEXDIGIT. Unless I'm mistaken
the spec already does this for other things, such as whitespace characters.

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Received on Friday, 22 October 2010 19:09:56 UTC

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