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[Bug 26597] New: XHTML media-type compatibility

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 14:07:19 +0000
To: public-html-admin@w3.org
Message-ID: <bug-26597-2495@http.www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/>
https://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=26597

            Bug ID: 26597
           Summary: XHTML media-type compatibility
           Product: HTML WG
           Version: unspecified
          Hardware: All
                OS: All
            Status: NEW
          Severity: normal
          Priority: P2
         Component: HTML5 spec
          Assignee: dave.null@w3.org
          Reporter: gary.evans84@live.co.uk
        QA Contact: public-html-bugzilla@w3.org
                CC: mike@w3.org, public-html-admin@w3.org,
                    public-html-wg-issue-tracking@w3.org

Within:-
http://www.w3.org/TR/html51/document-metadata.html#attr-meta-http-equiv-content-type

I believe there should be an adjustment or caveat for:-
http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml-media-types/#media-types

In which content should be "application/xhtml+xml" for XHTML polyglot files.

"Encoding declaration state (http-equiv="content-type")
The Encoding declaration state is just an alternative form of setting the
charset attribute: it is a character encoding declaration. This state's user
agent requirements are all handled by the parsing section of the specification.

For meta elements with an http-equiv attribute in the Encoding declaration
state, the content attribute must have a value that is an ASCII
case-insensitive match for a string that consists of: the literal string
"text/html;", optionally followed by any number of space characters, followed
by the literal string "charset=", followed by one of the labels of the
character encoding of the character encoding declaration.

A document must not contain both a meta element with an http-equiv attribute in
the Encoding declaration state and a meta element with the charset attribute
present.

The encoding declaration state may be used in HTML documents and in XML
Documents. If the encoding declaration state is used in XML Documents, the name
of the character encoding must be an ASCII case-insensitive match for the
string "UTF-8" (and    the document is therefore forced to use UTF-8 as its
encoding).

The encoding declaration state has no effect in XML documents, and is only
allowed in order to facilitate migration to and from XHTML."

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Received on Monday, 18 August 2014 14:07:24 UTC

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