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Re: How People with Disabilities Use the Web resource editing

From: Shadi Abou-Zahra <shadi@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 11 Aug 2017 10:03:58 +0200
To: Norah Sinclair <norah.sinclair@amac.gatech.edu>
Cc: Sylvie Duchateau <contact@sylvie-duchateau.fr>, EOWG Archive <public-eo-archive@w3.org>
Message-ID: <32d4309a-9578-e643-080d-6213df0ee9ba@w3.org>
[-Shawn, Sharron, and Brent who are following the archives AFAIK]

Hi Norah,

I think this is a great start in making the text more succinct!

Unfortunately I think that some important information is getting lost. 
Here is what I think some of the key points are for each paragraph:

[[
Mr. Lee wants to buy some new clothes, appliances, and music. As he 
frequently does, he is spending an evening shopping online with his 
tablet computer. He has one of the most common visual disabilities for 
men: color blindness, which in his case means an inability to 
distinguish between green and red.
]]

- "one of the most common visual disabilities for men" was intended to 
indicate the significance of this condition, which many readers may be 
unaware of.

- "inability to distinguish between green and red" was intended to make 
"color blindness" more tangible and understandable, for readers who are 
new to the topic.

- "with his tablet computer" was added in the most recent revision to 
help underline that people with disabilities use diverse devices too.


[[
Mr. Lee has difficulty reading the text on many websites because they 
use color combinations with poor contrast for text and images, which 
appear to him in indistinguishable shades of brown. For example, some 
websites highlight discount prices using red text, but all of the text 
look brown to him. Other websites use red to indicate required fields on 
forms, but again he cannot tell which fields have red text.
]]


- "poor contrast for text and images" was intended to underline that 
issues apply to both these cases, not only to text as some assume.

- "appear to him in indistinguishable shades of brown" is again for 
explanation of a particular condition, to make it more tangible.

- also the examples should describe specific situations in which the 
poor design causes real issues -- like in story telling and personas.


[[
	including the name of the color while showing a sample of the clothing;
	adding the word "discount" to discounted prices in addition to showing 
them in a different color;
	using text cues, such as an asterisk, to indicate the required fields 
on the order form in addition to showing them by color.
]]

- these relate to the specific examples previously described, to not 
make generic statements like "include color names with color swatch 
options for product selections" -- this leaves some readers thinking 
"how do I do that?".


[[
After additional experimentation, Mr. Lee discovered settings in his web 
browser that allow him to define customized color combinations for text, 
links, and the background. He also found a setting for high color 
contrast combinations in his web browser that he can switch on when he 
encounters websites that are difficult to read. However, this approach 
does not work for all websites  some are not coded to allow readers to 
override the default presentation.
]]

- this is not only speaking to web designers and developers, but also to 
web browser developers -- it is important to note the broad audience of 
this resources.


[[
Eventually, Mr. Lee bookmarked a series of online shopping sites where 
he could get reliable information on product colors or where he could 
override the colors, and not have to guess at which items were discounted.
]]

- this was intended to highlight the bookmarking technique (which may 
have become outdated by now), but also make the point that "you are 
losing business because people go elsewhere".


I don't think we need all these words to make these key points, but I 
think it is important not to lose these unless we really want to. In 
particular, I think we need to keep the text tangible so that readers 
who are completely new to the topic can get a good picture.

Happy to discuss, I'm not exactly sure what your thoughts are!

Best,
   Shadi


On 10/08/2017 22:18, Sinclair, Norah M wrote:
> Greetings,
> 
> 
> Attached is a draft attempt at revising one of the stories of web users, Mr. Lee, with the goal of making the content simple and brief. The document includes the current scenario and draft revised scenario. I'm seeking feedback as to whether this is going in the right direction before posting elsewhere.
> 
> 
> If there is a problem with the attached documents, please let me know. I included both Microsoft Word and rtf version.
> 
> 
> Thank you,
> 
> Norah
> 
> 
> Norah Sinclair
> Instructional Technology and User Support Specialist
> 
> AMAC Accessibility Solutions and Research Center
> Georgia Institute of Technology | College of Design
> 512 Means Street | Suite 250 | Atlanta, GA 30318
> 
> phone 404.894.7432
> www.amacusg.org<http://www.amacusg.org/>
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: Shadi Abou-Zahra <shadi@w3.org>
> Sent: Thursday, August 3, 2017 4:49 AM
> To: Sharron Rush; Sinclair, Norah M
> Cc: contact@sylvie-duchateau.fr; shawn@w3.org; Bakken, Brent; public-eo-archive@w3.org
> Subject: Re: How People with Disabilities Use the Web resource editing
> 
> Hi Norah,
> 
> Great approach, I look forward to your first edits.
> 
> I think the titles and surnames were there from the first versions and
> we just never changed them over the years. That's why fresh editors who
> question everything are excellent for rejuvenation! I think using just
> first names and more active voice is in line with the current direction
> that EOWG wants to take, so please go ahead and take a stab at it.
> 
> Regarding the number of stories, I don't think we ever set a hard limit
> but did our best to show broad diversity yet stay as brief as possible.
> We always get requests along the lines of "why is my most favorite use
> case not reflected". We also don't want to fall into the stereotypes of
> "web accessibility is for blind people", so want to show examples that
> people may not immediately think of. At the same time, if we only have
> these seemingly surprising examples, it may seem unrealistic to some.
> 
> My suggestion is to focus this version of editing on improving wording
> and presentation of the existing content, rather than to open that can
> of worms too. Unless you have a very clear picture of how to maintain
> the balance of disabilities and technologies with less stories. I also
> think that with the right presentation (including information design),
> this may not be as overwhelming as it currently seems on one long page.
> 
> Happy to discuss this further, this is just my suggestion.
> 
> Best,
>     Shadi
> 
> 
> On 02/08/2017 22:17, Sharron Rush wrote:
>> This is a great approach Norah, just what we were hoping people would be
>> inspired to do!  Thanks so much, I look forward to your story revision.  I
>> was not part of the decision to use the form titles and surnames so can't
>> really comment on what was the thinking there.  Will let Shadi be the guide
>> on that question.
>>
>> Thanks very much for your efforts - most appreciated!
>>
>> Best,
>> Sharron
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Aug 2, 2017 at 12:46 PM, Sinclair, Norah M <
>> norah.sinclair@amac.gatech.edu> wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks very much Shadi and Sharron.
>>>
>>>
>>>   From the resources provided, it looks as though this should be our editing
>>> approach:
>>>
>>> For most documents:
>>>
>>>      - *Simplify & Tersify*  Make content simple and brief. Cut words. Cut
>>>      Sentences.
>>>      - *Bullets & Graphics*  Break up passages into bullets when
>>>      appropriate. Suggest graphics.
>>>      - *Front-loaded Action*  Use active voice, and action statements.
>>>
>>> Also from Sharron's information, we should attempt to cut the verbiage of
>>> the resource in half. I'll attempt to revise one of the stories of web
>>> users with this approach and goal in mind and will share with Shadi and
>>> Sylvie for feedback. Also, has there been prior discussion regarding the
>>> number of stories? Are there too many stories? Would the use of first names
>>> be friendlier?
>>>
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>>
>>> Norah
>>>
>>>
>>> *Norah Sinclair *
>>> Instructional Technology and User Support Specialist
>>>
>>> AMAC Accessibility Solutions and Research Center
>>> Georgia Institute of Technology | College of Design
>>> 512 Means Street | Suite 250 | Atlanta, GA 30318
>>>
>>> phone 404.894.7432 <(404)%20894-7432>
>>> www.amacusg.org<http://www.amacusg.org>
>>>
>>>
>>> ------------------------------
>>> *From:* Sharron Rush <srush@knowbility.org>
>>> *Sent:* Friday, July 28, 2017 10:49 AM
>>> *To:* Shadi Abou-Zahra
>>> *Cc:* Sinclair, Norah M; contact@sylvie-duchateau.fr; shawn@w3.org;
>>> Bakken, Brent; public-eo-archive@w3.org
>>> *Subject:* Re: How People with Disabilities Use the Web resource editing
>>>
>>> Hey Norah,
>>>
>>> Hi Norah and Shadi,
>>>
>>> Tanks for collaborating so closely on this, much appreciated!
>>>
>>> It may also be useful to know that at today's meeting, we confirmed and
>>> agreed that for most resources, our goal will be to cut the verbiage by
>>> about half. Of course, that is not a hard and fast rule but a general goal
>>> to address the bloat that is currently displayed on WAI and that
>>> contributes to how hard it is to find the information we need.
>>>
>>> Please look at https://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/wiki/EOWG_Participation_Info#
>>> Editors:  and   https://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/wiki/Style#Appendix:_Edit_
>>> Examples for our developing approach to this aspect of the editing
>>> process.
>>>
>>> Thanks so much for your help!
>>>
>>> Best,
>>> Sharron
>>>
>>> On Thu, Jul 27, 2017 at 3:51 PM, Shadi Abou-Zahra <shadi@w3.org> wrote:
>>>
>>>> [resending with public archive public-eo-archive@w3.org in copy]
>>>>
>>>> Hi Norah,
>>>>
>>>> Thanks so much for taking this initiative!
>>>>
>>>> I look forward to working with you on this. I signed up because I have
>>>> been the primary editor for this resource for the past several years, and
>>>> want to help with the transition to the new primary editor(s).
>>>>
>>>> This document goes way back [1, 2]. I took over editing in 2009, where we
>>>> revised it into a multi-page resource [3, 4]. Last year we moved it to
>>>> GitHub [5, 6], and made a quick update to better address mobile.
>>>>
>>>> [1] https://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/PWD-Use-Web/
>>>> [2] https://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/PWD-Use-Web/changelog.html
>>>> [3] https://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/people-use-web/
>>>> [4] https://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/changelogs/cl-PWD-Use-Web.html
>>>> [5] https://w3c.github.io/wai-people-use-web/Overview.html
>>>> [6] https://github.com/w3c/wai-people-use-web
>>>>
>>>> There are only a few open issues in GitHub [6] which were left to this
>>>> next iteration. Some of these are minor edits but others relate to the
>>>> overall information and interaction design, and cross-linking between them.
>>>> We agreed to address these together with the WAI site redesign. I think
>>>> there were some ideas from the site redesign team for a complete
>>>> refactoring of this resource, but I'm not up-to-date on these. I think it
>>>> may be worthwhile to get on a call with them, if these suggestions are
>>>> still current. I'm curious how they envision the new architecture.
>>>>
>>>> Also, there is a GitHub issue relating to how cognitive and learning
>>>> disabilities are addressed in this resource. On the one hand, this has been
>>>> an on-going issue throughout the lifetime of this resource -- we want to
>>>> introduce the different types of disabilities to people who are new to the
>>>> topic, so inadvertently end up creating (rather medical) categories which
>>>> is kind of contrary to the universal design approach that we are suggesting
>>>> elsewhere in the resource. I think we need to revisit the terminology and
>>>> language used to describe all disabilities (not only cognitive and learning
>>>> disabilities) because these changed over time. Maybe we also find an
>>>> alternative approach altogether.
>>>>
>>>> I hope this is useful background on where we are and what I think the key
>>>> issues are, but don't hesitate if you have more questions. I would be happy
>>>> to get on the phone with you for further discussion too.
>>>>
>>>> Best,
>>>>     Shadi
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 26/07/2017 20:04, Sinclair, Norah M wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Hi Shadi and Sylvie,
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm reaching out to begin discussing the editing approach and process
>>>>> for the resource we will be co-editing, "How People with Disabilities Use
>>>>> the Web".
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Shadi, I know you have extensive experience editing this particular
>>>>> resource. Do you have a good idea of the type of restructuring that is
>>>>> needed? Do you have previous requirements documents or notes from recent
>>>>> discussions on changes to be made? In general, what are your thoughts on
>>>>> the best approach to this resource?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks very much,
>>>>>
>>>>> Norah
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Norah Sinclair
>>>>> Instructional Technology and User Support Specialist
>>>>>
>>>>> AMAC Accessibility Solutions and Research Center
>>>>> Georgia Institute of Technology | College of Design
>>>>> 512 Means Street | Suite 250 | Atlanta, GA 30318
>>>>>
>>>>> phone 404.894.7432
>>>>> www.amacusg.org<http://www.amacusg.org/>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Shadi Abou-Zahra - http://www.w3.org/People/shadi/
>>>> Accessibility Strategy and Technology Specialist
>>>> Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)
>>>> World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Sharron Rush | Executive Director | Knowbility.org | @knowbility
>>> *Equal access to technology for people with disabilities*
>>>
>>
>>
>>
> 
> --
> Shadi Abou-Zahra - http://www.w3.org/People/shadi/
> Accessibility Strategy and Technology Specialist
> Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)
> World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
> 

-- 
Shadi Abou-Zahra - http://www.w3.org/People/shadi/
Accessibility Strategy and Technology Specialist
Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)
World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
Received on Friday, 11 August 2017 08:04:06 UTC

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