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Re: [csswg-drafts] Let’s Define CSS 4 (#4770)

From: rickgregory via GitHub <sysbot+gh@w3.org>
Date: Tue, 10 Mar 2020 20:57:19 +0000
To: public-css-archive@w3.org
Message-ID: <issue_comment.created-597310818-1583873838-sysbot+gh@w3.org>
With all due respect to @benfrain and other authors, the issue of book titles is entirely secondary. If you choose to add a version into the title, that's your (or your publisher's) problem and thinking that CSS should or should not use versions because of the effect on such things is "tail wags dog" land. 

The heart of the matter to me is this - CSS adds things continually. Some of these are very minor edge cases. Some are major additions. Some are in between there. Right now, working developers have no organized way to track these additions and their support status. We might run across something by accident, think it sounds cool and find it's widely supported. Or find that it's Chrome only. Or... well you get it. Because of this, I think there's a lot of good CSS features that aren't getting the use they could get because most working devs simply do not have the time to haunt the WG's communications and there's nothing like a clear, organized feed summarizing new features and how widely supported they are.

Versioning is about two things. One, letting practitioners know what features both exist and are broadly supported in current browsers. Two, communicating to the edge players (designers, product folks, managers) that there's a new bag of features that it's safe to use. IF the WG and others want their work to be used widely, some kind of versioning will, I think, help that. Otherwise you have people working very hard to push CSS forward and seeing that hard work reach only a fraction of its potential audience. 

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Received on Tuesday, 10 March 2020 20:57:21 UTC

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