W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-css-archive@w3.org > September 2016

Re: [csswg-drafts] [css-color] What happens to rgb() etc with Working Color Spaces?

From: Florian Rivoal via GitHub <sysbot+gh@w3.org>
Date: Sun, 18 Sep 2016 16:55:43 +0000
To: public-css-archive@w3.org
Message-ID: <issue_comment.created-247859266-1474217741-sysbot+gh@w3.org>
> What I meant is that the values for the R, G and B primaries are 
taken to operate in the working color space.

For any RGB working color space, this will work, but you might get 
wacky colors, and I don't know how useful that is. If you pick a 
working color space with 3 channels that aren't RGB, this is going to 
be weird. If you pick a working color space in CMYK or some other 
thing with a number of channels other than 3, I don't know what it 
means.

>Exactly!
>
> The alternative is to manually change all the color rules to be in 
the working color space.

I don't follow: if your existing colors are specified in sRGB and 
they're the colors you want, you leave them as is. Even if you pick a 
different working color space, the math works out right, and they look
 just like you want them too. If you want to define colors in the 
working color space, you use color().

> Note that you don't necessarily have to set the working space to "do
 some new things that call for a bigger gamut". After all, that's 
exactly what we're doing today without this working color space 
feature.

Can you clarify? If you do a gradient from sRGB's most saturated red 
to P3's most saturated red (or if you don't care about gradients, put 
50% transparent one on top of the other), how is that going to work if
 your working color space isn't P3 or something large enough for both 
colors to be in gamut?

-- 
GitHub Notification of comment by frivoal
Please view or discuss this issue at 
https://github.com/w3c/csswg-drafts/issues/481#issuecomment-247859266 
using your GitHub account
Received on Sunday, 18 September 2016 16:55:50 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.4.0 : Thursday, 24 March 2022 20:26:34 UTC