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Re: WAI landing page for CogA

From: David Fazio <dfazio@helixopp.com>
Date: Fri, 8 Mar 2019 22:03:26 +0000
To: Shawn Henry <shawn@w3.org>
CC: public-cognitive-a11y-tf <public-cognitive-a11y-tf@w3.org>
Message-ID: <B4C02724-BE31-452F-B2B7-4E40494D095C@helixopp.com>
Yes, we get that, because we are on the inside. I’m just bringing it up to error on the side of caution 

This message was Sent from my iPhone. Please excuse any typographic errors. 

> On Mar 8, 2019, at 1:54 PM, Shawn Henry <shawn@w3.org> wrote:
> 
> Ah, interesting point. The long version of what this intends to say is: WCAG includes requirements that, when followed, make the [website] more accessible for people with cognitive and learning disabilities..." But we don't want to go into that much detail. :-)
> 
> I changed it to 'address':
> "For example, Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) includes requirements that address cognitive accessibility."
> 
> ~Shawn
> 
> 
>> On 3/8/2019 3:18 PM, David Fazio wrote:
>> I would be a little apprehensive to say “improve” cognitive accessibility. I’d prefer “ensure” or “related to” over “improve”. Only because there are techniques that actually scientifically improve/enhance cognition. Companies like Posit Science use them for rehabilitation, and other things.  I wouldn’t want to, in any way, allow for misconception.
>> Something like:
>>> For example, Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) includes requirements related to (or that ensure) cognitive accessibility. The requirements (known as “success criteria”) are in guidelines such as:
>> - Fazio
>> This message was Sent from my iPhone. Please excuse any typographic errors.
>>> On Mar 8, 2019, at 12:52 PM, Shawn Henry <shawn@w3.org <mailto:shawn@w3.org>> wrote:
>>> Hi Abi,
>>> 
>>> Thanks much for the input at <https://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-cognitive-a11y-tf/2019Mar/0036.html>. I agree that sentence is not totally smooth.
>>> 
>>> <start message>
>>> I am struggling with the sentence " They are under these and other guidelines:" in the section on Cognitive Accessibility in W3C standards. It does not seem a clear way to say this. My suggestion would be to add "such as" to the previous sentence so that it read:
>>> For example, Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) includes requirements (called “success criteria”) that improve cognitive accessibility such as:
>>> </end message>
>>> 
>>> 
>>> The issue is that the sentence talks about requirements/success criteria, yet the list is of guidelines (not success criteria). Also, some on the TF call wanted to avoid "For example" and "such as" in the same sentence -- which I agree with.
>>> 
>>> A couple of options:
>>> 1. For example, Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) includes requirements that improve cognitive accessibility. The requirements (called “success criteria”) are in guidelines such as:
>>> 2. For example, Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) includes requirements that improve cognitive accessibility. The requirements (called “success criteria”) are in these and other guidelines:
>>> 
>>> I do think #1 is more straightforward. However, it seem to me a bit wimpy. We really want this section to be strong. For that reason, I'm thinking #2 -- or something more like it -- might be better. Thoughts?
>>> 
>>> Thanks,
>>> ~Shawn
>>> <http://www.w3.org/People/Shawn/>
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
Received on Friday, 8 March 2019 22:03:52 UTC

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