W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > xml-dist-app@w3.org > October 2000

ebXML Abandons SOAP

From: Kurt Cagle <cagle@olywa.net>
Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2000 12:23:03 -0700
Message-ID: <009001c01513$385aa380$ac64640a@kurtslaptop>
To: <xml-dist-app@w3.org>
This came across the wire a little while ago. If true (and not merely a
propaganda piece) it has some disturbing implications for both SOAP and
messaging in general. As a general summary, it says that ebXML has decided
to pass on SOAP in favor of MIME-XML:

http://www.sdtimes.com/news/015/story1.htm

-- Kurt Cagle
----- Original Message -----
From: "Michael Brennan" <Michael_Brennan@Allegis.com>
To: <xml-dist-app@w3.org>
Cc: "'S. Mike Dierken'" <mike@knownow.com>
Sent: Monday, October 02, 2000 11:42 AM
Subject: RE: Quick Survey - Use SOAP - results


> > From: S. Mike Dierken [mailto:mike@knownow.com]
> > [...]
> > The results are mixed & I don't think we can draw any real
> > conclusions from
> > them - there were a lot of duplicate numbers and I was hoping
> > for a pure
> > ranking.
> > Here are the averages anyway:
> >
> > 2.1 - synchronous request/response generic XML
> > 2.8 - synchronous request/response RPC method calls
> > 2.2 - asynchronous message to a queue (single consumer)
> > 3.4 - asynchronous message to a topic (multiple subscribers)
> > 2.6 - other
>
> Well, one thing that can clearly be seen from these numbers is that SOAP
has
> clearly evolved from its RPC roots to be seen as a viable substrate for
more
> generalized messaging schemes. In fact, a narrow majority of the
respondents
> seem more interested in the latter than in RPC.
>
> Considering that SOAP is still widely viewed as simply a way of doing RPC
> with XML over HTTP, I think this is pretty significant.
>
>
Received on Monday, 2 October 2000 15:18:39 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Monday, 7 December 2009 10:58:57 GMT