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Re: Alternative Style Sheets

From: Gérard Talbot <www-style@gtalbot.org>
Date: Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:59:17 -0400
Message-ID: <ceca7ff93e5c45a7cc4b92311cc8bbfa.squirrel@ed-sh-cp3.entirelydigital.com>
To: "Markus Ernst" <derernst@gmx.ch>
Cc: "Dirk Schulze" <dschulze@adobe.com>, "W3C www-style mailing list" <www-style@w3.org>

Le Sam 13 octobre 2012 5:29, Markus Ernst a écrit :
> Am 12.10.2012 22:20 schrieb "Gérard Talbot":
>>
>> Le Ven 12 octobre 2012 13:14, Markus Ernst a écrit :
>>
>>> I think that the concept of alternate style sheets is somehow too
>>> unspecific for this use case. To address it, it would be nice to
>>> specify
>>> a standardized set of style sheet alternatives for the most common
>>> accessibility needs, such as big font size, high contrast,
>>> keyboard-only
>>> navigation or whatever.
>>
>>
>> I do not agree. Any webpage can be styled to honor the preferred
>> font-size
>> of the user. The font size should ideally be left to the user to decide.
>> So web authors shouldn't set it in webpage. Several people have
>> explained
>> this before. Felix Miata, Stephen Poley, Oliver Reichenstein, etc
>
> [...]
>
>> My position is: by default, the persistent, the preferred and the
>> alternate [1] stylesheets should always respect and honor the user's
>> font-size as set in his UA and they should always have sufficient,
>> effective color contrast promoting readability/legibility.
>
> You state that accessibility is not a use case for alternate style
> sheets, because accessibility should be the base of every design.

Yes. It should be as far as preferred font-size of visitors and effective
color contrast promoting readability/legibility.

> In an
> ideal world I would agree. But in reality, authors are most often not
> free to apply perfectly accessible designs. We have to stick to CD
> guidelines,

CD guidelines? I'm not sure I understand what this is. But, anyway, these
guidelines should not override the users' preferred font-size.

> or even get fully elaborated page designs from Graphic
> Designers that we have to implement.
>
> In these cases alternate stylesheets could be of help, but only (or at
> least much better) if their purpose would be identifiable by the
> browser, which would be possible with a specified set of accessibility
> style sheets.
>
> Let me give you an example. My favorite football club recently
> redesigned their website. It's awful: http://www.fcz.ch - they seemed to
> try hard to make it look "hip hop" resp. "urban", as they expect this to
> be what the fans like.

Most likely those football club fans are under 35-40 years old when/where
they do not mind small (and/or frozen) font sizes. Also, often web
designers are youngsters who do not have low vision and who prefer to have
a lot of stuff filing webpages and lots of flash animated stuff, cosmetic
effects, over-excessively driven by javascript, DHTML, etc.

> I doubt that there was any chance for the web
> designer to change the design towards more accessibility. But if (s)he
> could have suggested one or two alternate style sheets that respect
> accessibility needs, I am sure (s)he would have got the budget to write
> them.

Markus, I respectfully still disagree with you. I do not want websites to
create, develop, manage, tune alternate stylesheets in the name accessible
font-size and suitable/reasonable color contrast for
readability/legibility purposes. I want the normal default style sheets to
be accessible, not to override users' font-size, etc.

In order to override the users' preferred font-size, you have to code, to
add declarations, etc. In order to respect and honor the users' preferred
font-size, you have nothing to do, no code to add!

The following is one of my preferred quotes:

"
For this year's list of worst design mistakes, I decided to try something
new: I asked readers of my newsletter to nominate the usability problems
they found the most irritating.
(...)
1. Legibility Problems
Bad fonts won the vote by a landslide, getting almost twice as many votes
as the #2 mistake. About two-thirds of the voters complained about small
font sizes or frozen font sizes; about one-third complained about low
contrast between text and background.
"
Top Ten Web Design Mistakes of 2005
http://www.useit.com/alertbox/designmistakes.html

Gérard
-- 
CSS 2.1 Test suite RC6, March 23rd 2011
http://test.csswg.org/suites/css2.1/20110323/html4/toc.html

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Received on Sunday, 14 October 2012 01:59:49 GMT

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