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Re: [css3-fonts][css-variables][css-counter-styles-3][css3-values] Case sensitivity of user-defined identifiers

From: Brian Kardell <bkardell@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Oct 2012 11:49:27 -0400
Message-ID: <CADC=+jdqAc4HDRP5XzA26HN23sPpVrMH=H+d9iYeRu08AxZ6_A@mail.gmail.com>
To: Jonathan Kew <jfkthame@googlemail.com>
Cc: www-style@w3.org
Brian Kardell :: @bkardell :: hitchjs.com
On Oct 3, 2012 11:33 AM, "Jonathan Kew" <jfkthame@googlemail.com> wrote:
>
> On 3/10/12 16:08, François REMY wrote:
>>
>> |  I have to admit I don't understand why we can't just make variable
names
>> |  case-sensitive...
>>
>> For what it's worth, [css-variables] are described to be standards
>> properties so they should obey traditionnal rules applied to CSS
>> properties.
>>
>> In HTML, user-defined attributes seems to be case-insenstive for Latin1
>> at least (tested in IE9, Chrome 24) :
>>
>>     document.body.setAttribute("â", true);
document.body.getAttribute("Â");
>>
>
> From my (brief) testing just now, Chrome's case-insensitivity in this
example seems to extend much beyond Latin-1 (e.g. it includes Cyrillic, as
well as Vietnamese accented letters); it's probably simple Unicode
case-folding.
>
> Firefox, on the other hand, seems to be only ASCII (not Latin-1)
case-insensitive.
>
> JK
>
>

Just an observation, but if firefox doesn't have a ton of issues/requests
and people blogging about this: how likely is it that only ASCII is really
a huge problem?
Received on Wednesday, 3 October 2012 15:49:58 GMT

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