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Re: [css3-text] proposed value for text-align: no-justify

From: Alan Gresley <alan@css-class.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2010 18:08:40 +1100
Message-ID: <4CBBF278.9090402@css-class.com>
To: Simon Montagu <smontagu@smontagu.org>
CC: timeless <timeless@gmail.com>, Aryeh Gregor <AryehGregor@gmail.com>, Boris Zbarsky <bzbarsky@mit.edu>, Christoph P├Ąper <christoph.paeper@crissov.de>, "www-style@w3.org list" <www-style@w3.org>
Simon Montagu wrote:
[snip]
> That said, I don't agree with Aryeh either: in newspaper articles with 
> narrow justified columns hyphenation seems to be quite common. In 
> printed books it's much rarer, but it is used now and then.


I have seen words split by hyphenation in old books written in 
English. Having viewed microfilms of 19th century newspapers shows 
that it was then a very common practice for splitting long words by 
hyphenation.

Here is an example for 1877 in the first two columns.

<http://pauldorpat.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/dispatch-122477p1-web.jpg>


Here is an example for 1939 which is mostly justified but with a 
little bit of hyphenation. See notes under picture (top right) showing 
the word Ambassa-dor.

<http://orwelldiaries.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/express-24-8-39-page-1.jpg>



-- 
Alan http://css-class.com/

Armies Cannot Stop An Idea Whose Time Has Come. - Victor Hugo
Received on Monday, 18 October 2010 07:09:16 GMT

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