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Re: CSS Gradients

From: Ernest Cline <ernestcline@mindspring.com>
Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 00:24:25 -0400
Message-ID: <410-22004551442425593@mindspring.com>
To: "Andrew Fedoniouk" <news@terrainformatica.com>, "W3C CSS List" <www-style@w3.org>


> [Original Message]
> From: Andrew Fedoniouk <news@terrainformatica.com>
>
> I would suggest to use four separate corner colors instead of two
> colors and direction specification.
>
> background-gradient=gradient(color1,color2,color3,color4);
>
> Don't need to specify rotation or angle in this case. Already there.
> And it's easy.

Easy to specify, but not easy to compute.  It's not difficult to compute
either in my opinion.  When dealing with graphics anything that for
an n by n picture is O(n^2) is average, less than that is easy, and
worse than that is hard in my opinion.  But my objection to rectangular
gradients has little to do with their computation complexity (which is
only worse by a scaling factor than a freely rotated linear gradient)
but primarily with their lack of general applicability.

Rectangular gradients make little sense for borders and absolutely
no sense for outlines.  If gradients should be added to CSS at all,
it should be done in a way that mixes well with all color properties,
not just some of them.  I don't want to special case the foreground
and background by having rectangular gradients apply to them
but not to the border and outline.

If you can point out a sensible way to apply rectangular gradients
to borders and outlines and still get the same effect as this proposal
does, then I'd be for it, but I just don't see it.
Received on Friday, 14 May 2004 00:24:47 GMT

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