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Re: Putting context in RDF serialization

From: Jonathan Borden <jborden@mediaone.net>
Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2000 14:05:42 -0500
Message-ID: <07c801c06b81$0fbe5920$0a2e249b@nemc.org>
To: "Seth Russell" <seth@robustai.net>
Cc: "Sean B. Palmer" <sean@mysterylights.com>, "RDF-IG" <www-rdf-interest@w3.org>
Seth Russell wrote:

> Jonathan Borden wrote:
>
> > <Bag ID="context2">
> >         <li resource="#S2"/>
> >         <li resource="#S3"/>
> >         <li resource="#S4"/>
> > </Bag> [most of example snipped]
>
> Ok that seems to work.  It does make us explicitly issue a ID to every
statement
> and explicitly place each statement in its context(s).  Do you really
think
> people are going to do that and/or programmers are going to program
applications
> to read and write it?

My example employs explicit IDs for clarity purposes. I have demonstrated
that every XML node in any XML document has a URI which is the concatenation
of the base URI of the originating document '#' xpointer where the xpointer
fragment identifier can be either an ID or a ChildSeq  (see the XPointer
spec). rdfExtractify.xsl implements this behavior to name otherwise
'anonymous' nodes.

The example you have snipped shows implicit inclusion of statements in a
container/context. The example you have left above shows explicit inclusion
of statements in a container/context. You have a choice e.g.

<RDF xml:base="...foo">
    <Description bagID="...bar">
            ... statements here ...
    </Description>
    <Description about="..."> ... 'anonymous' container (bagID = xpointer)
</RDF>

this can be interpreted as a container representing the whole document and
containers representing each description. This is just as usable as anything
I've seen proposed.

Jonathan Borden
The Open Healthcare Group
http://www.openhealth.org
Received on Thursday, 21 December 2000 14:18:51 GMT

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