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Re: Accept-Charset support

From: Andrea Vine [CONTRACTOR] <avine@dakota-76.Eng.Sun.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 10:53:02 -0800
Message-Id: <199612111853.KAA01050@gongolo.eng.sun.com>
To: masinter@parc.xerox.com, www-international@w3.org
Cc: avine@dakota-76.Eng.Sun.COM
Larry,
You have taken my quote out of context.  Let me replace the context:

From rosenne@NetVision.net.il
> >(from someone else)
> >Prediction: This will not always be true. I would expect more translation/
> >transliteration servers to appear in the near future.
> 
> If I do not know Japanese, transliteration will not be of much use. If I do,
> I would prefer Japanese characters.
> 
> 
From me:

> # I, on the other hand, would, because I have a limited knowledge of
> # Japanese characters/ideographs/logographs, but a much more extensive
> # knowledge of spoken Japanese.  This is not unusual amongst
> # Japanese-as-2nd-language speakers.
> 
> Another user:
> 
> > My favorite color is blue. I would prefer to have web pages with blue
> > backgrounds and white text rather than red and green. Red really makes
> > me angry!
> 
> Just because users have some preference doesn't mean that putting the
> preference into the user agent request string is useful.

My point:

It is not intuitively obvious what the user wants to see.  I'm not arguing
that the preference be included in the user agent request string.  I am giving
an example of the diversity of user preferences.

Make of it what you will, but I suspect user-end interpretation is going to 
be difficult.  In any case, I refuse to be a party to any particular camp 
in this issue.  I monitor this list mostly for information.

Andrea
Received on Wednesday, 11 December 1996 13:45:59 GMT

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