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Re: XHTML Basic 1.1 and setting input field to numeric mode

From: Luca Passani <passani@eunet.no>
Date: Tue, 01 Jul 2008 12:19:24 +0200
Message-ID: <486A04AC.9050201@eunet.no>
To: Benjamin Hawkes-Lewis <bhawkeslewis@googlemail.com>
CC: Mark Birbeck <mark.birbeck@webbackplane.com>, Tina Holmboe <tina@greytower.net>, Shane McCarron <shane@aptest.com>, "Michael(tm) Smith" <mike@w3.org>, www-html@w3.org

Benjamin Hawkes-Lewis wrote:
> Luca Passani wrote:
>> My code is separating content from presentation for real. Your code 
>> isn't. Your code is a mess.
>
> I really don't follow you. Neither set of outputs corrupt meaning by 
> making it reliant on presentation. However, your output mixes 
> presentation and content, such that the style and content are output 
> in the same place and styles cannot be overridden if necessary 
> (because of the "style" attribute's specificity). My output puts them 
> in separate places, and allows styles to be overridden if necessary. 
> My code would allows the creation of media-specific styles or multiple 
> skins, but yours would not, given the current limitations of the style 
> attribute. That's what I mean by your content being intrinsically 
> bound to your presentation.
>
> The code differences simply reflect the different outputs. As such the 
> code differences in themselves are not ugly or hacks (in either case); 
> they are simply doing a different job. 

we must be coming from different words. My code does the job quickly, 
simply and elegantly. Yours doesn't.

 > However, your output mixes presentation and content, such that the 
style and content are
 > output in the same place and styles cannot be overridden if necessary
 > (because of the "style" attribute's specificity).

if I chose to use @style, it means that I did not want the possibility 
to override the the style for that tag.
The fact is that I know what I am doing. I want to specify that the 
element must have a given 'width'. Full stop. I don't want to specify 
some funny, abstract, reusable CSS properties.
Also, I am not sure who decided that the width of an element is 
necessarily presentation
and cannot be considered content in many circumstances.
What if I am representing statistic through a set of red bars whose 
length reflects the data? why should I go through the horrible mess of 
using server- or client-side scripting just to make sure that I can 
attach a reference to a CSS, and not the raw property directly?

I cannot believe that you are not seeing this

Luca
Received on Tuesday, 1 July 2008 10:20:14 GMT

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