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Re: is javascript considered good wacg 2.0 practice?

From: Harry Loots <harry.loots@ieee.org>
Date: Mon, 17 Dec 2012 12:44:38 +0100
Message-ID: <CA++-QFfDRCq3ojz8AQZvLufrb179SsAKenvV_Vo6igxmA2SdpA@mail.gmail.com>
To: Ramón Corominas <listas@ramoncorominas.com>
Cc: accessys@smart.net, W3C WAI ig <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
On 17 December 2012 11:42, Ramón Corominas <listas@ramoncorominas.com>wrote:

> "Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 covers a wide range of
> recommendations for making Web content more accessible. Following these
> guidelines will make content accessible to a wider range of people with
> disabilities, including blindness and low vision, deafness and hearing
> loss, learning disabilities, cognitive limitations, limited movement,
> speech disabilities, photosensitivity and combinations of these. Following
> these guidelines will also often make your Web content more usable to users
> in general."
>
>
> Note the last sentence. The guidelines will often be good for everyone,
> but it does not mean that they are aimed at everyone's needs.
>
> So please stop mixing access problems with accessibility barriers.
>

I think this draws a conclusion, which the guidelines never intended,
so let's re-examine the guideline:
In the first part it says:

*... "(WCAG) 2.0 covers a wide range of recommendations"...  "Following
these guidelines will make content accessible to a wider range of people
with disabilities".*


An in the second part:

*"Following these guidelines will also often make your Web content more
usable to users in general."*


This means that it will also make it more accessible - in general - to
users who do not have disabilities.

It does not say that it is not aimed at everyone's needs.

Kind regards; Harry
Received on Monday, 17 December 2012 11:45:11 GMT

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