W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ig@w3.org > January to March 2012

Re: approval

From: Marc Haunschild <mh@zadi.de>
Date: Thu, 23 Feb 2012 07:08:34 +0100
Message-ID: <4F45D7E2.7070104@zadi.de>
To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Thanks for pointing this out, George. Of course there is a wide range of 
vision impairments - each with its own needs.

I just wanted to keep the answer short and simple. My suggestion was: 
imagine yourself, what help do people need with certain disabilities.

Besides this I gave a few examples illustrating this - as a first 
approach to accessibility.

All the other posts here were correct, but it seemed to me, they have 
had just too much information for a beginner.

Marc

Am 22.02.2012 13:56, schrieb G F Mueden:
> Marc, please amend your category list  to point out the vast difference
> between those who don't see and those who don't see well; their needs are
> quite different and what helps one group is often of no help to the other.
> Further, while all the blind are equally blind, there is variety in the
> needs of those who still read with their eyes but not well.
> Typically they suffer from (1) poor acuity (sharpness of focus) and (2) poor
> contrast sensitivity (ability to distinguish between shades of colors or
> grays).  A third difficulty is small field size, not so prevalent but
> important.
>
> The fix for #! is generally only half known.  Everybody knows about
> magnification.  The other part is the need for word wrap to keep copy on the
> screen.   Without it every line must be chased to its end, scrolling right
> and then left for the start of the next line.
> The fix for #2 is not magnification (often suggested), but is choice of font
> for incoming text.  Poor contrast sensitivity calls for thicker strokes in
> the lines that make the characters, so the use of bold fonts is the fix.
> User's software can provide them, but formatting can prevent their use.
> Magnification help only a little.  A bigger faint character is still faint.
>
> Enough.  To learn more, "Accessibility for Eye Readers". 12k and growing, is
> available as an email attachment from gfmueden@verizon.net
> Commentts welcome.
>
> George   ===gm===
>
>
>
>
>
>
> .
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Marc Haunschild"<mh@zadi.de>
> To:<w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
> Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2012 1:06 AM
> Subject: Re: approval
>
>
> | Hi Meliha,
> |
> | Simple question, simple answer. There are four categories of problems,
> | people might have using a website
> |
> | vision
> | hearing
> | movement
> | cognition
> |
> | can be less than average or (partially) non-existent (like the ability
> | to see colors or to see with just one eye).
> |
> | Some things, which can be a challenge in real life, do not influence the
> | usage of a website a lot: like sitting in a wheel chair.
> |
> | I think this is clear. So just try to understand what needs have people
> | which cannot see. Can they use your site? How? It is quite easy to
> | support them: they use screenreaders, programs that read your content.
> | You have to provide ALL the content as text (also what is on your
> | pictures). Now disable your css and look at your pages: everything
> | should be linearly ordered in just one dimension: from top to bottom.
> | Make sure, that the content is provided in the correct order: does it
> | still make sense? Or do you use phrases like:  on the left you see... -
> | which is nonsense now, because there is no left or right ;-)
> |
> | Try this with other disabilties. What is a problem for people that
> | cannot move very good: if they cannot put there arms way up in the air,
> | its propably no problem to use a mouse and keyboard, but if they have a
> | tremor, its very difficult for them to klick on tiny buttons and icons.
> |
> | With this approach you can find out a lot about your own site. If you
> | like exoeriments: Just try to use your page with your feet instead of
> | hands, wear glasses for watching 3d-movies (these with green and red
> | "glass")
> |
> | And further just use your imagination.
> |
> | One thing which is difficult to understand: people whonever were able to
> | hear, normally do not speak even the language of there own country. They
> | use gestures for communication. So they cannot read your texts - at
> | least only with big difficulties. So try to keep your sentences short,
> | remain essentially, just write, like everybody should write anyway:
> | there are a lot of descriptions/tutorials out there in the web, How to
> | write texts.
> |
> | You will see - all of this improvements will help everybody to use your
> | site - like already saif here: accessibility ist usability for everybody.
> |
> | Good luck with your site!
> |
> | Am 20.02.2012 10:59, schrieb Meliha Yenilmez:
> |>  Hi Everone,
> |>
> |>  I have two questions.
> |>
> |>  First one, I want to learn our web site is accessible or not? How can
> |>  our web site approval for accessbile or no?
> |>
> |>  And second one, if our web page/pages is accessible,  who can give
> |>  conformance logo/s?
> |>
> |>  Thanks for all,
> |>
> |>  *Meliha Yenilmez*
> |
> | Marc
> |
>
>


-- 
Mit freundlichen Grüßen,

i. A. Marc Haunschild
Zugängliche Anwendungsentwicklung und Qualitätskontrolle
______________________________________________

Referat 614 - Konzeption und Aufbau von Informationsdiensten
Bundesanstalt für Landwirtschaft und Ernährung
Anschrift: Deichmanns Aue 29, 53179 Bonn
Telefon: +49 (0)228 99 6845-7324
Fax: +49 (0)228 99 6845-7111
E-Mail: marc.haunschild@zadi.de
Internet: www.ble.de
_______________________________________________
Received on Thursday, 23 February 2012 06:09:04 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Thursday, 23 February 2012 06:09:05 GMT