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RE: * for required Re: Inline Style Sheet Question

From: Steven Faulkner <steven.faulkner@nils.org.au>
Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 16:49:46 +1000
To: <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <OHEEKDBODCBIIKIGGIMDKELGFPAA.steven.faulkner@nils.org.au>

chaals wrote
>You could also use the title attribute, but remember that this is not  
>going to be sen by some users at all so don't rely on it as the only  
>mechanism.


You need to be careful where you implement the title attribute as it is
not recognised by screen readers on most elements that cannot receive
keyboard focus
Also if placed on an input element it overrides the content of the label
element for some versions of JAWS and is overidden by the label content
in window eyes 4.02 

best regards
stevef


> -----Original Message-----
> From: w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org]On
> Behalf Of Charles McCathieNevile
> Sent: Friday, 8 April 2005 4:05 PM
> To: Beheler Kim; Harry Woodrow; w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
> Subject: * for required Re: Inline Style Sheet Question
> 
> 
> 
> Hi Kim,
> 
> in principle you are not wrong, although this may be a case where you

> could sensibly use a span, since the semantics you are conveying are
not  
> necessarily emphasis.
> 
> However one thing that many screen reader users in particular do to
make  
> life more bearable is set their system not to listen to punctuation.
So  
> the asterisk itself will be ignored...
> 
> A couple of ways around it: emphasise the labels (although some screen

> readers don't actually pick up emphasis at all :-( for things that are

> required, or put a word like optional or required in. This last is  
> becoming much more common, and strikes me as the best solution 
> where there  
> are just a couple of optional or just a couple of required fields.
> 
> You could also use the title attribute, but remember that this is not

> going to be sen by some users at all so don't rely on it as the only  
> mechanism.
> 
> cheers
> 
> Chaals
> 
> On Fri, 08 Apr 2005 11:04:20 +1000, Beheler Kim <beheler_kim@bah.com>

> wrote:
> 
> > I thought that using Color to convey information would be something
> > like...
> >
> > All text in Red indicates a negative value.  $5.00
> >
> > In my case you have the text "* indicates a required field" at the
top
> > of the page and the * would be the reason it is not just color
conveying
> > the information.  Someone please correct me if I am wrong.
> > -----Original Message-----
> >
> > From: w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-ig-request@w3.org]
On
> > Behalf
> >
> > Of Beheler Kim
> >
> > Sent: Friday, 8 April 2005 8:40 AM
> >
> > To: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
> >
> > Subject: RE: Inline Style Sheet Question
> >
> >
> >
> > Thanks for everyone's feedback. I guess I should've given more of an
> > explanation of why I wanted to use different colors. I have a
sentence
> > that says: "* indicates a required field", where the * will be red.
> > Throughout the page (and web site) the * will be next to required
form
> > elements.  I will either use the <strong> or <em> tag to format the
*.
> 
> -- 
> Charles McCathieNevile                      Fundacion Sidar
> charles@sidar.org   +61 409 134 136    http://www.sidar.org
> 


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Received on Friday, 8 April 2005 06:50:02 GMT

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