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Re: Is This JavaScript Menu Accessible?

From: Charles McCathieNevile <charles@w3.org>
Date: Mon, 15 Jan 2001 03:05:36 -0500 (EST)
To: Christopher Atkinson <cwa@pipeline.com>
cc: <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.30.0101150248130.14219-100000@tux.w3.org>
Hmm. I had a rough look. The difference between not having a menu, and having
the menu appear at the bottom, is significant. In IE with scrits turned on I
got the Navlink last in the tabbing order. I think this would happen in a
DOM-based screen reader, such as JAWs, but it may come out differently in a
screen reader based on an Off Screen Model, such as Outspoken (more or les
the only serious option on a Macintosh, as far as I can tell).

I think the absence of a menu is not too cool a feature - I am not sure if it
means that I can't get to the same things, but it does mean there is not a
consistent navigation metaphor - a thing which is sometimes there for
navigation is sometimes not there for navigation, and I find that confusing.

Also, activating the navigation link in Explorer produced a popup window,
which surprised me. And completely disoriented me - it took me about two
minutes to figure out what was going on, and I could see the entire screen,
everything that was going on, ... I would recommend against it.

I don't know if there are absolute barriers, but it clearly doesn't pass at
level double-A of WCAG, (the popup window violates checkpoint 10.1, and the
navigation scheme arguably violates 13.4) and I think there are
genuine barriers that make the site difficult to use.

This is the value of a multi-level priority scheme. I think anybody can get
access to the content, so it can meet level-A (althoguh I obviously haven't
tested tis in detail) but there are barriers that make it difficult to use.
Fixing those would clear the way towards claiming double-A...

As an example of aother approach, you might like to check out
http://www.ausopen.com - the Australian Open Tennis site. It uses, in some
versions, javascript: links, which I hate, but there are alternatives
available when scripts are not working. So I can't think of a situation when
the content is not accessible (although again, I have not done more than a
quick skim, and would be intersted in other people's thoughts on the site).

my 2c worth (Hmmm. I wonder if that means a full evaluation is cheap or
expensive. It probably works out at about $4. maybe I need to change my price
structure <grin/>)

cheers

Charles McCN

On Mon, 15 Jan 2001, Christopher Atkinson wrote:


  I have a really simple JavaScript menuing system on my personal website.
  >From recent discussions here, it seems like JavaScript is a bit of a
  problem.

  I want to make sure it's accessible, or at least doesn't mess people up, or,
  if not, get any suggestions people might have to make it okay.

  Menu scripts are only triggered if browser is Netscape or Explorer versions
  4 and up. For people with screenreaders/assistive technologies riding on top
  of IE/NS, either there will be no menu or menu will "appear" at bottom of
  page. I hope.

  If anyone wants to help, pages are:

  For Explorer homepage URL is http://www.pipeline.com/~cwa/TYWHome.htm.

  For Netscape the menuing system does not appear on the homepage due to
  Cascading Stylesheet bugs, but does appear on inside pages, for example:
  http://www.pipeline.com/~cwa/Bohemian_Phase.htm.

  Thanks in advance for any help or advice anyone is kind enough to give me.

  Regards,

  Chris Atkinson



-- 
Charles McCathieNevile    mailto:charles@w3.org    phone: +61 (0) 409 134 136
W3C Web Accessibility Initiative                      http://www.w3.org/WAI
Location: I-cubed, 110 Victoria Street, Carlton VIC 3053, Australia
until 6 January 2001 at:
W3C INRIA, 2004 Route des Lucioles, BP 93, 06902 Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France
Received on Monday, 15 January 2001 03:05:37 GMT

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