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RE: Text equivalents

From: Dick Brown <dickb@microsoft.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2000 16:12:14 -0800
Message-ID: <5F68209F7E4BD111A5F500805FFE35B91AF0E492@RED-MSG-54>
To: "'Bruce Bailey'" <bbailey@clark.net>, Anne Pemberton <apembert@crosslink.net>, Web Accessibility Initiative <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Anne, I'm not sure what you mean by this:

* And browsers which work with standard sound cards don't seem to be
commonly available even in the nearby cities. Perhaps I've looked in the
wrong places.

The widely-distributed browsers such as Netscape and IE don't work directly
with sound cards but rely on the operating system (and assistive technology
such as screen readers) doing so. What kind of problems do you have with the
sound?

Dick Brown
Program Manager, Web Accessibility
Microsoft Corp.
http://www.microsoft.com/enable/


 -----Original Message-----
From: 	Bruce Bailey [mailto:bbailey@clark.net] 
Sent:	Wednesday, March 15, 2000 1:52 PM
To:	Anne Pemberton
Cc:	Web Accessibility Initiative
Subject:	RE: Text equivalents

> The popular browsers do not read as yet. If they did, this would be a fine
> solution for some/many, but it isn't here yet. Browsers that read
> to a user
> are not typically (if any) user-friendly to ordinary users. And browsers
> which work with standard sound cards don't seem to be commonly available
> even in the nearby cities. Perhaps I've looked in the wrong places.

Anne,
Have you (on anyone else on this list) tried these "ReadPlease" products?  I
think they are made by the "textHELP" people.  Relatively inexpensive ($50)
and works with IE, Netscape, Opera.
http://www.readplease.com/
http://www.texthelp.com/

My apologies for mistakenly addressing a letter from Jonathan to you.
Received on Wednesday, 15 March 2000 19:13:16 GMT

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