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RE: RE: R: NEW: Issue #1544

From: John M Slatin <john_slatin@austin.utexas.edu>
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2005 09:58:23 -0500
Message-ID: <6EED8F7006A883459D4818686BCE3B3B01B0628D@MAIL01.austin.utexas.edu>
To: "Bob Regan" <bregan@macromedia.com>, <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Cc: <rscano@iwa-italy.org>, "Andrew Kirkpatrick" <akirkpatrick@macromedia.com>
Bob Regan asks:
 
<blockquote>
Let's present the question directly to the group. It is relevant. Can a
non-W3 technology meet WCAG? Can a proprietary technology meet WCAG? I
have long
been under the assumption that the answer is yes, it can. If the
definition of accessibility has changed, then we should get that out in
the open.

</blockquote>
 
The 30 June 2005 Public Working Draft of WCAG 2.0, available at
http://www.w3.org/tr/wcag20, states explicitly that content created with
non-W3C technologies *can* conform:
 
<blockquote>
Technology assumptions and the "baseline"
 
WCAG 2.0 defines accessibility guidelines and success criteria as
functional outcomes. These outcomes are described in a technology
independent way in order
to allow conformance using any Web technology that supports
accessibility. WCAG 2.0 therefore does not require or prohibit the use
of any specific technology.
It is possible to conform to WCAG 2.0 using both W3C and non-W3C
technologies, as long as they are supported by accessible
user agents.

</blockquote>
 
John
 

"Good design is accessible design."

Dr. John M. Slatin, Director 
Accessibility Institute
University of Texas at Austin 
FAC 248C 
1 University Station G9600 
Austin, TX 78712 
ph 512-495-4288, fax 512-495-4524 
email jslatin@mail.utexas.edu 
Web  <http://www.ital.utexas.edu/>
http://www.utexas.edu/research/accessibility 

-----Original Message-----
From: w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org [mailto:w3c-wai-gl-request@w3.org] On
Behalf Of Bob Regan
Sent: Saturday, August 13, 2005 1:56 PM
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Cc: rscano@iwa-italy.org; Andrew Kirkpatrick
Subject: RE: RE: R: NEW: Issue #1544



Roberto, 

 

Flash in this context can be thought of as the presentation layer. If
the user does not have the required user agents, then a text equivalent
can be delivered. 

 

I would add that this is the very same strategy used by W3 technologies
such CSS and SVG. Further, to my knowledge, there are no configurations
of user agents that directly render SVG.

 

Let's present the question directly to the group. It is relevant. Can a
non-W3 technology meet WCAG? Can a proprietary technology meet WCAG? I
have long been under the assumption that the answer is yes, it can. If
the definition of accessibility has changed, then we should get that out
in the open. 

 

Cheers,
Bob


------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
bob regan | macromedia | 415.832.5305




 
Received on Monday, 15 August 2005 14:58:35 GMT

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