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RE: simple language testable thing

From: Al Gilman <al.gilman@comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 2004 10:04:21 -0500
Message-Id: <5.1.0.14.2.20040204094622.01ec6b30@pop.mail.iamworld.net>
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org

At 07:57 AM 2004-02-04, lisa seeman wrote:

>OK, I was being ambiguous (or ever just plain incorrect)
>
>Let me try and say what I mean.
>
>Words written in a different alphabet to that of the primary natural
>language of the plain are foreign words and should have a translation
>provided...
>
>True?

Lisa:

The word I believe you want is 'script' as used in the UniCode 
literature.  Compare with the way scripts appear in XForms:

   http://www.w3.org/TR/2003/REC-xforms-20031014/sliceE.html#mode-scripts

Jens, Charles (and somewhat Lisa):

You are being caught in the popular confusion of UCS, the Character Set for 
XML,
and the 'Charset' HTTP-header parameter which indicates an *encoding* such as
windows-1252 or UTF-8.

  http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/html-spec/charset-harmful

The cure for this is the "Character Model for the WWW" -- watch for another
Last Call on this.

http://www.w3.org/TR/charmod/

Charles:

The fact that the default transport encoding for HTTP and the default content
encoding for XML are different is a negligible nuisance.  First, the default
for HTTP was set before XML existed, and second, anyone who understands *why*
they are using XML will indicate the encoding used *explicitly* and not rely
on the default properties of the transport to communicate to consumers what the
bits mean.

Al

>All the best
>Lisa Seeman
>
>Visit us at the UB Access website
>UB Access - Moving internet accessibility
>
>
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Jens Meiert [mailto:jens.meiert@erde3.com]
> > Sent: Wednesday, February 04, 2004 11:12 AM
> > To: lisa seeman
> > Cc: y.p.hoitink@heritas.nl; w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
> > Subject: RE: simple language testable thing
> >
> >
> > > In Hebrew (for once ) this is easy.
> > > A foreign word is written in a different character set.
> >
> > CMIIW, but since the UCS (Universal Character Set, often
> > referred to as
> > Unicode) is the document character set for HTML/XML, they
> > (foreign words) ain't written in a different character set.
> >
> > Again referring to to John (see my last post [1]) I claim
> > this is an issue where unimpaired users are affected as well.
> > Also, I don't see any need for ruling language use by the WAI
> > WG (there already was such a discussion a few months ago [2] ;).
> >
> >
> > All the best,
> >  Jens.
> >
> >
> > [1]
> > http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-gl/2004JanMar/0169
>.html
>[2] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/w3c-wai-gl/2003OctDec/0411.html
>
>
>--
>Jens Meiert
>Interface Architect
>
>http://meiert.com/
Received on Wednesday, 4 February 2004 10:04:55 UTC

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