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Action Item: Additional Examples Guideline 2.5 (user error)

From: Doyle-Work <dburnett@sesa.org>
Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 15:01:25 -0800
To: W3C Web Content <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Message-ID: <BCC7ECC5.2A50%dburnett@sesa.org>

Hello All -

This combined with my earlier post related to accessibility and usability
make up my action item from last weeks teleconference.  At least this is a
start.  New examples start below <proposed examples>.

Doyle


Guideline 2.5 Help users avoid mistakes and make it easy to correct them.
[level 2 guideline]

 

Level 1 Success Criteria for Guideline 2.5

 

1.         No level 1 success criteria for this guideline.

 

Level 2 Success Criteria for Guideline 2.5

 

1.         If a user error is detected, the error is identified and provided
to the user in text

 

2.         If a user error is detected, and suggestions for correction are
known and can be provided without jeopardizing security or purpose (for
example, test validity), they are provided (in an accessible form that meets
Level 1 success criteria).

 

3.         Where consequences are significant and time-response is not
important, one of the following is true:

 

a.            Actions are reversible.

 

b.         Where not reversible, actions are checked for errors before going
on to the next step in the process.

 

c.         Where not reversible, and not checkable, the user is able to
review and confirm or correct information before submitting it.

 

 

Level 3 Success Criteria for Guideline 2.5

 

1.         Where the input options are known, there are less than 75 of
them, and they can be provided without jeopardizing security, test validity,
etc, users are allowed to select from a list of options as well as to enter
text directly. 

 

2.         Checks for misspelled words are applied and correct spellings are
suggested when text entry is required.

 

 

Who Benefits from Guideline 2.5 (Informative)

 

Identifying typing errors helps individuals with writing disabilities and
people with dyslexia who often have difficulty writing text in forms or
other places that need text input.

 

Allowing users to select an option from a list instead of having to enter
text directly helps individuals with speech disabilities because they might
not be recognized properly in voice input applications.

 

Examples of Guideline 2.5 (Informative)

 

Example 1: a search engine.

 

A search engine is provided with a variety of search options for different
skill levels and preferences. It includes a spell checker and offers "best
guess" alternatives, query-by-example searches, and similarity searches.

 

<proposed examples>

 

Example 2: online form

 

An airline web site offers a special promotion on discounted flights.  The
user is asked to fill out a simple form that asks for personal information
such as name, address, phone number, seating preference and e-mail address.
When the user submits the form with a form field not filled in, the user is
notified there is an error but all correct information from the previous
form stays unchanged.  This prevents the user from having to re-enter all of
the previous information.

 

Example 3: online form (same form but a different scenario)

 

An airline web site offers a special promotion on discounted flights.  The
user is asked to fill out a simple form that asks for personal information
such as name, address, phone number, seating preference and e-mail address.
If any of the fields of the form are either not filled out or filled out
incorrectly, the user is warned of the input error.  The user is now
presented with the same form, all previously and correctly entered
information is still available.  The user is asked to make corrections to
any form field marked with a red arrow or two asterisks **.  Note  color
alone is not used to indicate errors.

 

Example 4: pull-down selections

 

A web retailer offers online shopping for customers interested in fly
fishing gear.  When the user is asked for his/her country, a pull down list
of countries is offered instead of having the user fill in the information
by typing. To possibly make things easier, the user is informed that
countries are listed in alphabetical order.

 

Example 5: form submission confirmation

 

A web user fills out an online form and submits the form by accidentally
activating the web page submit button.  A second resource appears and warns
the user that the information as displayed will be sent once the final
conformation is confirmed by using the final submit button.  The web author
has given users a second chance to confirm that all information is correct.

 
</proposed examples>


Doyle Burnett
Education and Training Specialist
Multiple Disabilities Program
Special Education Service Agency
dburnett@sesa.org
Www.sesa.org
-- 
Received on Wednesday, 12 May 2004 19:01:49 GMT

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