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Strawman Proposal: WCAG 2.0 Compliance

From: Kynn Bartlett <kynn-edapta@idyllmtn.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2000 22:50:36 -0700
Message-Id: <a05001900b5fb2ebdeee5@[10.0.1.2]>
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
The purpose of this strawman proposal is not to present a full
solution but rather to provide a possible option with the intent
to generate discussion and bring out new concepts which may not
have been explored yet.  This is presented in the hopes that it
will provoke thought in new directions.



Straw Man Compliance Model for WCAG 2.0:

1.  Checkpoints do not have priorities.  All checkpoints ARE
     REQUIRED.  There is no such thing as an optional checkpoint
     (although there may be inapplicable checkpoints).

2.  Each technique identifies one or more technologies to which it
     applies.  The technologies are:

     Any          - Applies to all
     Design       - Applies to any application in which the user will
                    interface with the content in a manner specified
                    by the content or markup author (and not by the
                    user agent designer)
     Generated    - Server-side programs which generate content, either
                    in a batch or on the fly

     CSS          - Cascading Style Sheets level 1 or 2
     CSS1         - Cascading Style Sheets level 1
     CSS2         - Cascading Style Sheets level 2
     Java         - Java applets and applications
     HTML         - HTML 4.01, 4.0, 3.2, or 2.0
     HTML4        - HTML 4.01 or 4.0
     SMIL         - Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language
     SVG          - Scalable Vector Graphics
     XHTML        - XHTML 1.0 or 1.1
     XHTML1       - XHTML 1.0
     XHTML1.1     - XHTML 1.1 (Modularized XHTML)
     XML          - Any XML-compliant language
     XSLT         - Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations
     XSL-FO       - Extensible Stylesheet Language Formatting Objects

     The lists above are -not- exhaustive.

3.  Each technique has a compliance statement which indicates how the
     technique satisfies the requirements of the checkpoint.  Each
     compliance statement is specific to one or more technologies.
     Compliance is stated as follows:

     A.  Minimal compliance

         Applying this single technique is sufficient to remove the
         most serious of accessibility barriers and can be considered
         minimal satisfaction of the checkpoint.  (Note:  Not all
         checkpoints will have minimal compliance techniques for all
         technologies.)

     B.  Partial compliance

         Applying this technique in addition to any for minimal
         compliance will remove serious accessibility barriers; however,
         applying a single such technique alone does not constitute full
         compliance with the checkpoint.  (Note:  Not all checkpoints
         will have partial compliance techniques for all technologies.)

     C.  Full compliance

         Applying this technique in addition to any for minimal compliance
         will remove nearly all accessibility barriers.  (Note:  Not all
         checkpoints will have full compliance techniques for all
         technologies.)

         One or more partial compliance techniques, when combined with
         minimal compliance techniques, may constitute full compliance
         with the checkpoint; these are noted in the compliance statements
         for the specific techniques.

4.  It is currently not defined how one is able to comply with a
     checkpoint if it is inapplicable, or if there are no defined
     techniques for a given technology.  This is a matter for discussion
     at the face-to-face meeting and the mailing list.


Examples:

In the examples below I have taken the first checkpoint for each of the
six guidelines in the 28 September 2000 working draft of WCAG 2.0, and
added techniques.  These are not complete and are meant merely to
illustrate how this proposal would work -- not to suggest that these
should be the final techniques for each checkpoint.


Guideline 1:  Design content that can be presented visually, auditorily, or
               tactually, according to the needs and preferences of the user.

1.1  Ensure, by providing text equivalents to auditory and graphical
      presentations as necessary, that every component of a document,
      web page, or multimedia presentation can be rendered as text in a
      standard character set.

      Techniques:

      1.1.1 (Any)

        Create a version of the content which does not use auditory and
        graphical presentation.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique minimally satisfies Checkpoint 1.1.

      1.1.2 (HTML, XHTML):

        Use the alt attribute on the img tag to specify textual equivalents for
        images.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 1.1.

      1.1.3 (HTML4, XHTML):

        Use the longdesc attribute on the img tag to specify long 
descriptions of
        complex images.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 1.1.  When
        used with Technique 1.1.2, this fully satisfies Checkpoint 1.1 for
        images.

Guideline 2:  Separate content and structure from presentation and explicitly
               define significant structural or semantic distinctions in
               markup or in a data model.

2.1  Use markup languages properly and in accordance with specification.

      Techniques:

      2.1.1 (HTML4):

        Use valid HTML 4.01, or 4.0 according to specification.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique minimally satisfies Checkpoint 2.1.

      2.1.2 (XHTML1):

        Use valid XHTML 1.0 according to specification.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique minimally satisfies Checkpoint 2.1.

      2.1.3 (CSS):

        Use valid CSS level 1 or CSS level 2 according to specification.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique minimally satisfies Checkpoint 2.1.

      2.1.4 (HTML, XHTML)

        Use structural markup (such as BLOCKQUOTE) only for structural
        purposes, not to affect presentation.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 2.1.

      2.1.5 (HTML, XHTML)

        Use presentational markup (such as FONT) only for presentational
        purposes, and not to indicate semantic meaning.  (See also
        Checkpoints 2.3 and 2.4.)

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 2.1.
        When used with Technique 2.1.4 and 2.1.1 or 2.1.2, this techinque
        fully satisfies Checkpoint 2.1.

Guideline 3:  Design for ease of comprehension

3.1  Use a consistent style of presentation that will facilitate
      comprehension of the content.

      Techniques:

      3.1.1 (Design):

        Use a consistent look and feel for each page, retaining similar
        design elements across the site.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique minimally satisfies Checkpoint 3.1.

      3.1.2 (Generated):

        Create consistent templates for navigation and display which
        are used across the site to create the user interface.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 3.1.
        When used with Technique 3.1.1, this fully satisfies Checkpoint
        3.1.

      3.1.3 (CSS, XSLT):

        Create common stylesheets which are applied to site content to
        effect a consistent presentation style.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 3.1.
        When used with Technique 3.1.1, this fully satisfies Checkpoint
        3.1.

Guideline 4:  Design for ease of browsing and navigation

4.1  Provide clear and consistent navigation mechanisms throughout a
      document, application or site.

      Techniques:

      4.1.1 (Design):

        Use a consistent navigation method applicable across the entire
        document, application, or site, which allows access to all
        content on the site.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique minimally satisfies Checkpoint 4.1.

      4.1.2 (Design):

        Logically organize links in a navigation bar which is used
        across the site or application.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 4.1.

      4.1.3 (Design):

        Create a table of contents or site overview which introduces
        the content of the site.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 4.1.

      4.1.4 (Design):

        Create a hierarchal site map which allows direct access to any
        section of the site or application.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 4.1.

      4.1.5 (Design):

        Create an alphabetic index by subject or keyword which allows
        direct access to any content.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 4.1.

      4.1.6 (Design):

        Create anchors within long pages (3 or more headings) which allow
        direct access to content.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 4.1.
        When used with Techniques 4.1.1, 4.1.2, 4.1.3, 4.1.4, and 4.1.5,
        this fully satisfies Checkpoint 4.1.

Guideline 5:  Design user interfaces for device independence

5.1  Associate an explicit label with each user interface control

      Techniques:

      5.1.1 (HTML, XHTML):

        Place the label for each form element on the same line as the
        control, BEFORE the form for (list), and AFTER the form for
        (list).

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique minimally satisfies Checkpoint 5.1.

      5.1.2 (HTML, XHTML):

        Identify form control labels with the label and legend elements.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 5.1.

      5.1.3 (HTML, XHTML):

        Group form controls using the (whatever) elements.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 5.1.
        When used with Techniques 5.1.1 and 5.1.2, this fully
        satisfies Checkpoint 5.1.

Guideline 6:  Design content to be compatible with the features and
               capabilities of user agents, including those that only
               support older technologies or standards.

6.1  Make sure that web sites which take advantage of newer technologies
      continue to be usable when such technologies are turned off or
      not supported.

      Techniques:

      6.1.1 (Any):

        Avoid using technologies which were not widely supported by
        major browsers released three or more years ago.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique minimally satisfies Checkpoint 6.1.

      6.1.2 (XHTML):

        Create XHTML pages according to the HTML compatibility rules
        described in the XHTML specification.

        COMPLIANCE:  This technique partially satisfies Checkpoint 6.1.
        When used with Technique 6.1.1, this fully satisfies Checkpoint
        6.1.

-- 
--
Kynn Bartlett <kynn@idyllmtn.com>
http://www.kynn.com/
Received on Saturday, 30 September 2000 01:53:16 GMT

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