W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-sgml-wg@w3.org > November 1996

RE: CSS1 becomes W3C Proposed Recommendation

From: Arjun Ray <aray@nmds.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Nov 1996 01:45:56 -0500
Message-Id: <1.5.4.32.19961116064556.00307820@www.nmds.com>
To: "Chris Wilson (PSD)" <cwilso@microsoft.com>, "'Paul Prescod'" <papresco@calum.csclub.uwaterloo.ca>, "'w3c-sgml-wg@w3.org'" <w3c-sgml-wg@w3.org>
At 10:39 AM 11/15/96 -0800, Chris Wilson (PSD) wrote:
>It's not actually lost; any character can be escaped in a CSS selector
>name.  According to section 7.2 of the CSS PR, 
>
>'in CSS1, selectors...can also contain escaped characters and any
>Unicode character as a numeric code...the backslash followed by at most
>four hexadecimal digits (0..9A..F) stands for the Unicode character with
>that number...any character except a digit can be escaped to remove its
>special meaning, by putting a backslash in front, Example: "\"" is a
>string consisting of one double quote.'
>
>Does this suffice to address your concerns?

No. It would be much simpler all around for interoperability if CSS1 abided
by the naming conventions of the Reference Concrete Syntax. In fact, insofar
as CSS1 has some (integral?) relation with HTML, I see no reason why it
shouldn't square with naming conventions legal in HTML.

Or are you saying that we should take something bog-standard and
gratuitously break it with an unnecessary escaping "convention"?


Arjun
--
"Features whose purpose is to cause errors should be removed." -- Erik Naggum 
Received on Saturday, 16 November 1996 01:44:05 EST

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