W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-rdfcore-wg@w3.org > December 2002

Re: Using third-party vocabularies

From: Graham Klyne <GK@NineByNine.org>
Date: Wed, 04 Dec 2002 16:56:10 +0000
Message-Id: <5.1.0.14.2.20021204164021.04451e70@127.0.0.1>
To: pat hayes <phayes@ai.uwf.edu>, Jeremy Carroll <jjc@hplb.hpl.hp.com>
Cc: w3c-rdfcore-wg@w3.org

At 10:18 AM 12/4/02 -0600, pat hayes wrote:
>>[[
>>In publishing a statement with potentially significant legal or social 
>>consequences, one should take care to use vocabulary whose meaning is 
>>well-defined, stable and known to correspond to the intended 
>>meaning.  For important documents, such as contracts, this may mean that 
>>use of third-party vocabulary is restricted to terms defined by 
>>legislature, recognized standards bodies or other reputable 
>>organizations.  Using terms from untrustworthy sources may have 
>>unintended consequences.
>>]]


>Yes, I like the above. But I think that the general principle goes beyond 
>just the 'significant' legal cases: it applies everywhere.

Ah, I see your point.  This suggests a slight rearrangement;  the general 
case, leading in to the 'significant' concerns:

[[
When making statements that use terms defined by a third party, one should 
take care that the third party definition is consistent with ones intended 
meaning, or the statements may have unintended consequences.

In particular, when publishing a statement with potentially significant 
legal or social consequences, use only vocabulary whose meaning is 
well-defined, stable and known to correspond to the intended 
commitment.  For important documents, such as contracts, this may mean that 
use of third-party vocabulary is restricted to terms defined by 
legislature, recognized standards bodies or other reputable organizations, 
or that otherwise have socially well-established meanings.
]]

#g


-------------------
Graham Klyne
<GK@NineByNine.org>
Received on Wednesday, 4 December 2002 12:05:23 EST

This archive was generated by hypermail pre-2.1.9 : Wednesday, 3 September 2003 09:54:48 EDT