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[Bug 10] Round-tripping various information in properties

From: <bugzilla@soe.ucsc.edu>
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 04:47:34 -0800
Message-Id: <200512311247.jBVClYLX016418@ietf.cse.ucsc.edu>
To: w3c-dist-auth@w3.org

http://ietf.cse.ucsc.edu:8080/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=10

julian.reschke@greenbytes.de changed:

           What    |Removed                     |Added
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
         AssignedTo|julian.reschke@greenbytes.de|elias@cse.ucsc.edu
             Status|ASSIGNED                    |NEW
            Version|-08                         |-09



------- Additional Comments From julian.reschke@greenbytes.de  2005-12-31 04:47 -------
Here's the full set of differences ("OLD" is draft-ietf-rfc2518bis-09, "NEW" is
the text I have proposed in November, and that we've been discussing on the
mailing list). (also re-assigning to Elias for next conference call)

Section 4., para. 18:
OLD:

    A property is always represented in XML with an XML element
    consisting of the property name, called the "property name element".
    The simplest example is an empty property, which is different from a
    property that does not exist:

NEW:

    A property is always represented with an XML element consisting of
    the property name, called the "property name element".
 
    The simplest example is an empty property, which is different from a
    property that does not exist:

(note the redundant "...in XML..." -- is there another way to represent a
property that the spec describes?)    
    

Section 4., para. 19:
OLD:

       <R:title xmlns:R="http://www.example.com/ns/"></R:title>

NEW:

       <title xmlns="http://www.example.com/ns/"></title>

(this is about the simplest possible property, and adding a namespace prefix
here IMHO is just confusing)       
       

Section 4., para. 20:
OLD:

    The value of a property appears inside the property name element.
    The value may be any kind of well-formed XML content, including both
    text-only and mixed content.  In the latter case, servers MUST
    preserve certain aspects of the content (described using the
    terminology from [W3C.REC-xml-infoset-20040204]).

NEW:

    The value of the property appears inside the property name element.
    It may be any kind of well-formed XML content, including both text-
    only and mixed content.  In the latter case, servers MUST preserve
    certain aspects of the content.  Using the terminology from [REC-XML-
    INFOSET], the following rules apply:

(I think "The value of *the* property..." is better here, because this is a
continuation from the previous section; also even to a non-native english
speaker having two sentences start with the same words looks bad (why this
change???)
    
Section 4., para. 22:
OLD:

       [namespace name]
 
       [local name]
 
       [attributes] named "xml:lang" or any such attribute in scope

       [children] of type element or character

NEW:

       [namespace name],

       [local name],

       [attributes] named "xml:lang" or any such attribute in scope,

       [children] of type element or character.

(Punctuation)
       
       
Section 4., para. 24:
OLD:

    On all Element Information Items in the value:

       [namespace name]

       [local name]

       [attributes]

       [children] of type element or character

NEW:

    On all Element Information Items that are descendants of the property
    name element:

       [namespace name],

       [local name],

       [attributes] and

       [children] of type element or character.

(Editorial)


Section 4., para. 29:
OLD:

    On Attribute Information Items in the value:

       [namespace name]

       [local name]

       [normalized value]

NEW:

    On Attribute Information Items:

       [namespace name],

       [local name] and

       [normalized value].

(Punctuation; also "in the value" doesn't seem to be precise to me, what does
"in" mean?)
       

Section 4., para. 33:
OLD:

    On Character Information Items in the value:

       [character code]

NEW:

    On Character Information Items:

       [character code].

Again, what does "in the value" mean here? Are there Character Information Items
"outside" the value?
       

Section 4., para. 35:
OLD:

    Since prefixes are used in some XML query/handling tools, servers
    SHOULD preserve, for any Information Item in the value:

       [prefix]

NEW:

    Future revisions of this specification may also require to preserve
    namespace prefixes for child elements of the property name elements,
    thus servers SHOULD preserve the [prefix] as well.
    [[preserve.more.xml: Feedback if we should ask implementors to
    preserve more in the future is appreciated (such as comments).]]

(I do not object to changing the language here, but "..are used in some XML
query/handling tools..." certainly doesn't help explaining the issue)
    

Section 4., para. 37:
OLD:

    In dead properties (considered as content, like document bodies)
    servers are encouraged to (MAY) preserve, for any Comment Information
    Item in the value:
 
       [content]

NEW:

(remove this; servers MAY preserve whatever they want; the introduction of a
distinction between dead and live properties doesn't make things clearer)


Section 4., para. 39:
OLD:

    The XML attribute xml:space MUST NOT be used to change white space
    handling.  White space in property values is significant.

NEW:

    Also note that whitespace inside values is always significant, and
    that servers MUST NOT support overriding this using the xml:space
    attribute.

(This is almost the same. The "OLD" text seems to make a PROPPATCH with
xml:space="preserve" illegal, while the "NEW" text tells servers to ignore it
should it be there; I think the latter more accurately reflects WG consensus).

    
Section 4., para. 42:
OLD:

      <D:prop xml:lang="en">
        <x:author xmlns:x='http://example.com/ns'>
          <x:name>Jane Doe</x:name>
          <!-- Jane's contact info -->
          <x:uri type='email'
                 added='2005-11-26'>mailto:jane.doe@example.com</x:uri>
          <x:uri type='web'
                 added='2005-11-27'>http://www.example.com</x:uri>
          <x:notes xmlns:h='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
            Jane has been working way <h:em>too</h:em> long on the
            long-awaited revision of <![CDATA[<RFC2518>]]>.
          </x:notes>
        </x:author>
      </D:prop>

NEW:

        <D:prop xml:lang='en' xmlns:D='DAV:'>
          <x:author xmlns:x='http://example.com/ns'>
            <x:name>Jane Doe</x:name>
            <!-- Jane's contact info -->
            <x:uri type='email' added='2005-11-26'
            >mailto:jane.doe@example.com</x:uri>
            <x:uri type='web' added='2005-11-27'
            >http://www.example.com</x:uri>
            <x:notes xmlns:h='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
              Jane has been working way <h:em>too</h:em> long on the
              long-awaited revision of <![CDATA[<RFC2518>]]>.
            </x:notes>
          </x:author>
        </D:prop>

(these seem to be identical except for whitespace between attributes)        
        

Section 4., para. 43:
OLD:

    When this property is requested, a server might return:

NEW:

    When retrieving the property, a server may return:

(don't care)
    

Section 4., para. 44:
OLD:

      <author xmlns:x='http://example.com/ns' xml:lang="en"
              xmlns='http://example.com/ns'
              xmlns:ns1='http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml'>
          <x:name>Jane Doe</name>
          <x:uri   added="2005-11-26" type="email"
            >mailto:jane.doe@example.com</uri>
          <x:uri   added="2005-11-27" type="web"
            >http://www.example.com</uri>
          <x:notes>
            Jane has been working way <h:em>too</h:em> long on the
            long-awaited revision of &lt;RFC2518&gt;.
          </x:notes>
      </author>
    Note in this example:

NEW:

        <D:prop xmlns:D='DAV:'>
          <author xmlns="http://example.com/ns"
                     xmlns:x="http://example.com/ns"
                     xml:lang="en">
            <x:name>Jane Doe</x:name>
            <x:uri added="2005-11-26" type="email"
            >mailto:jane.doe@example.com</x:uri>
            <x:uri added="2005-11-27" type="web"
            >http://www.example.com</x:uri>
            <x:notes xmlns:h="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
              Jane has been working way <h:em>too</h:em> long on the
              long-awaited revision of &lt;RFC2518&gt;.
            </x:notes>
          </author>
        </D:prop>
    Note:

(the "OLD" example is broken in at least three ways: (1) amount of whitespace in
property value changed, (2) parse errors (mismatched start/end tags), (3) usage
of undefined namespace prefix; as a general comment: if people start editing
carefully crafted XML examples, please run them through an XML parser afterwards).
    
Section 4., para. 45:
OLD:

    o  The [prefix] for the property name itself was not preserved, being
       non-significant

NEW:

    o  The [prefix] for the property name itself was not preserved, being
       non-significant,

(Punctuation)       
       

Section 4., para. 48:
OLD:

    o  whitespace between tags has been preserved everywhere (whitespace
       between attributes not so),

    o  CDATA encapsulation was replaced with character escaping (the
       reverse would also be legal),
NEW:

    o  the [prefix] has been preserved on the child element "notes",

    o  whitespace between tags has been preserved everywhere (but the
       fact that CDATA escaping was used is irrelevant), and

(note the absense of the statement about prefix preservation in "OLD", the
remainder seems to be editorial)
       
Section 4., para. 51:
OLD:

    Implementation note: there are cases such as editing scenarios where
    clients may require that XML content is preserved character-by-
    character (such as attribute ordering or quoting style).  In this
    case, clients should consider using a text-only property value by
    escaping all characters that have a special meaning in XML parsing.

NEW:

    Implementation note:
 
       There are cases such as editing scenarios where clients may
       require that XML content is preserved character-by-character (such
       as attribute ordering or quoting style).  In this case, clients
       should consider using a text-only property value by escaping all
       characters that have a special meaning in XML parsing.

(Indentation)




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Received on Saturday, 31 December 2005 12:47:43 GMT

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