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Re: Visitors Guide to Vancouver

From: Tom Rutt <tom@coastin.com>
Date: Mon, 09 Jan 2006 15:33:41 -0500
To: David Orchard <dorchard@bea.com>
Cc: "Rogers, Tony" <Tony.Rogers@ca.com>, David Hull <dmh@tibco.com>, public-ws-addressing@w3.org
Message-id: <43C2C8A5.6070006@coastin.com>

David Orchard wrote:

>Huh.  On the "Wet coast", we often pronounce schedule with the hard "k"
>sound.  I wonder if that the "sh" version is a central Canada thingy.  
>  
>
The announces on "hocky night in Canada" (we got Canadian TV in Detroit 
as well) also said "shedule"

I guess they are from central Canada.

Just like US TV announcers typially sound like they are from Chicago 
(except for the late Peter Jennings who kept a slight
Canadian accent out of National pride).

Tom

>Dave
>
>  
>
>>-----Original Message-----
>>From: Tom Rutt [mailto:tom@coastin.com]
>>Sent: Monday, January 09, 2006 12:19 PM
>>To: David Orchard
>>Cc: Rogers, Tony; David Hull; public-ws-addressing@w3.org
>>Subject: Re: Visitors Guide to Vancouver
>>
>>David Orchard wrote:
>>
>>    
>>
>>>Two shots, nice!
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Canadians generally do not consider themselves American, no more
>>>      
>>>
>than
>  
>
>>>Massachusetts or Californian residents pride themselves on being
>>>Alabamans or Texans.  And no more than Argentinian's or Brazillians
>>>consider themselves "American" because they live in South America.
>>>Different political entities and all that.
>>>
>>>
>>>One tip that I can readily offer is that if you would like to "go
>>>native" in Canada, you can try a slightly different saying of words
>>>that contain "out", starting with "out and about".  It sounds almost
>>>like "oot", as in "oot and aboot".
>>>
>>>      
>>>
>>I grew up in Detroit, which is a suburb of Windsor Ontario Canada.
>>
>>Since I am a native US american, I feel I should give my percieved
>>pronounciation of "out and about" in Canadian
>>
>>it is more like "ouoot" and "abouut", ( actually halfway between that
>>and what Dave suggests).
>>
>>They also pronunce schedule as "shedule", just like our British pals.
>>
>>Tom Rutt
>>
>>    
>>
>>>  Another trick is to periodically end sentences with "eh".  One
>>>      
>>>
>thing
>  
>
>>>not to do, is to wear a backpack with a big Canadian flag.
>>>      
>>>
>Apparently
>  
>
>>>that's mandatory gear for Americans traveling to Europe these days.
>>>But people can always tell the difference, because Canadians of
>>>      
>>>
>course
>  
>
>>>have a small Canadian flag on their back pack.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Cheers,
>>>
>>>Dave
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>      
>>>
>------------------------------------------------------------------------
>  
>
>>>*From:* Rogers, Tony [mailto:Tony.Rogers@ca.com]
>>>*Sent:* Sunday, January 08, 2006 10:12 PM
>>>*To:* David Hull; David Orchard
>>>*Cc:* public-ws-addressing@w3.org
>>>*Subject:* RE: Visitors Guide to Vancouver
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>You really have to watch the Canadian spellings, too - most
>>>English-speaking countries have "straits", but they have "straights"
>>>      
>>>
>-
>  
>
>>>any bets that their "straights" are narrow?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>:-)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>      
>>>
>------------------------------------------------------------------------
>  
>
>>>*From:* public-ws-addressing-request@w3.org on behalf of David Hull
>>>*Sent:* Mon 09-Jan-06 17:08
>>>*To:* David Orchard
>>>*Cc:* public-ws-addressing@w3.org
>>>*Subject:* Re: Visitors Guide to Vancouver
>>>
>>>Dave,
>>>
>>>Thanks for the writeup, and particularly the native's perspective.
>>>      
>>>
>A
>  
>
>>>few questions come to mind:
>>>
>>>    * Do people speak mainly Canadian there, or will they understand
>>>      English?
>>>    * I notice that public parks are measured in hectares and speed
>>>      limits in km/h, but seawalls are measured in miles.  Are there
>>>      any other interesting non-metric measurements in use?
>>>    * Will my CDs still play in Canada, or will they have to be
>>>      converted to metric?
>>>    * Do Canadians consider themselves American, and if not, what
>>>      continent do they claim to live on?
>>>
>>>Seriously though, I still remember an incident from fifteen years or
>>>so ago at a service counter somewhere in the bowels of YYZ.  I was
>>>coming back from the Netherlands and had plenty of time to make my
>>>connection.  The gentleman ahead of me, also from the US, was not so
>>>fortunate.  Growing ever more irate, he told the clerk that he had
>>>been at the gate N minutes before departure (I forget what value of
>>>N).  The clerk informed him that he had need to be there N+k minutes
>>>before departure.  "No," the gentleman said, "the FAA regulations
>>>      
>>>
>say
>  
>
>>>N minutes."   "Sir," the clerk said, "it's N+k minutes," and then,
>>>with a perfectly timed pause and icy politeness, "You're in a
>>>different country, sir."
>>>
>>>David Orchard wrote:
>>>
>>>I've written up a Visitor's Guide to Vancouver at
>>>
>>>http://www.pacificspirit.com/VancouverGuide.html.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Hopefully this will provide some useful information for visitors.
>>>      
>>>
>Let
>  
>
>>>me know if you have any comments, criticisms, suggestions.  Bear in
>>>      
>>>
>mind
>  
>
>>>I've been somewhat time constrained of late :-)
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Huge, Mark, can we get this linked to from the w3c wsa registration
>>>
>>>pages?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Cheers,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Dave
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>      
>>>
>>--
>>----------------------------------------------------
>>Tom Rutt	email: tom@coastin.com; trutt@us.fujitsu.com
>>Tel: +1 732 801 5744          Fax: +1 732 774 5133
>>
>>    
>>
>
>  
>


-- 
----------------------------------------------------
Tom Rutt	email: tom@coastin.com; trutt@us.fujitsu.com
Tel: +1 732 801 5744          Fax: +1 732 774 5133
Received on Monday, 9 January 2006 20:33:57 GMT

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