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Re: [widgets] dir and span elements

From: Marcos Caceres <marcosc@opera.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 15:25:34 +0100
Message-ID: <4B9F94DE.9060707@opera.com>
To: Richard Ishida <ishida@w3.org>
CC: "'Phillips, Addison'" <addison@amazon.com>, "'Scott Wilson'" <scott.bradley.wilson@gmail.com>, "'public-webapps'" <public-webapps@w3.org>, public-i18n-core@w3.org, "'Felix Sasaki'" <felix.sasaki@fh-potsdam.de>


On 12/03/10 7:27 PM, Richard Ishida wrote:
> I agree with Felix.  Note also for example that the HTML 4.01 spec also says
> "This attribute specifies the base direction of directionally neutral text
> ...  in an element's content *and attribute values*. " (my emphasis).

Ok, I've rewritten the following algorithms to make sure a direction is 
always associated with a string (as well as the language):

http://dev.w3.org/2006/waf/widgets/#rule-for-determining-directionality
http://dev.w3.org/2006/waf/widgets/#rule-for-getting-a-single-attribute-valu
http://dev.w3.org/2006/waf/widgets/#rule-for-getting-text-content-with-norma


> There are, of course, some problems with applying directionality to
> attributes where their base direction is different than that of the element
> content or they contain text which needs to have embeddings applied to just
> a part of the text.  These are some of the reasons that we and the ITS spec
> always advise against using user readable text in attributes - use elements
> for that stuff.

Yeah, we kinda stuffed up in a few places then: "version" attribute of 
the widget element, the "short" attribute of the widget name, and 
possibly the email attribute of the author element. If we find that they 
start to cause problems in the wild, we might deprecate them in the 
future in favor of element-based equivalents.

Kind regards,
Marcos



-- 
Marcos Caceres
Opera Software
Received on Tuesday, 16 March 2010 14:26:16 GMT

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