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testing IA & navigation early prototype

From: Shawn Lawton Henry <shawn@w3.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Oct 2004 16:28:14 -0500
To: <public-wai-eo-site@w3.org>
Cc: "'Wayne Dick'" <wed@csulb.edu>, "'Pasquale Popolizio'" <pasquale@osservatoriosullacomunicazione.com>, "'Judy Brewer'" <jbrewer@w3.org>
Message-ID: <000001c4bba2$b3f09100$917fb118@SLHenry>

WSTF folks,

I have completed most of the changes to the prototype that we agreed on
in yesterday's teleconference - at:
http://www.w3.org/2004/09/wai-nav/8-home

Please remember that this is a very rough partial prototype of the
navigation only, and as such:
- many of the links do not work (including the skip to content) [1]
- this is a design-less "wireframe" (without any visual design)
- the markup and style sheet are not technically sound

Please send comments and initial findings to the WSTF list for
discussion online and at next week's teleconference.

Here are some points to focus on for this round of testing:

A. How does the general IA and navigation design work?
B. Is the expanding, collapsing, end nodes, etc. intuitive?
C. Are the "annotated navigation pages" understandable in their
relationship to the hierarchical navigation?
D. How comfortable or uncomfortable are users that when one node is
expanded the peer nodes are not (Carol's point sent in email)? 
E. Is the presentation and interaction of the lower levels under UAAG
links understandable? [task: "Find the UAAG 1.0 FAQ." Then, from the
UAAG 10 FAQ, "Find the UAAG 1.0 Testimonials"]
F. How does the category label "WAI groups" work? Does Guidelines &
Resources > Guidelines & Techniques work? [3]

Here are some points to compare from the baseline test [2]:

Task 4: Your team at work is developing a Web site and you have some
concerns about how accessible the Web site might be to people with
disabilities. Using this Web site, determine whether or not it contains
information about the basic things Web developers need to know about Web
accessibility.

goal: Quick Tips
* Note especially the path they take, as there are a few different ones.

Task 5: A few of your colleagues are interested in finding out how to be
a part of WAI's effort to develop guidelines for Web accessibility.
Using this Web site, determine whether or not opportunities exist for
becoming involved in WAI Web Content guideline development.

* The prototype doesn't have the "answers" to this yet. However, it
would be interesting to see where they look, e.g., "WAI Groups"?

Task 6: You have just been handed a report, generated by a Web
accessibility evaluation tool, which informs you that your company Web
site contains complex information graphs that do not meet "Checkpoint
1.1." Using this Web site determine how you would meet Checkpoint 1.1
and make the graphs accessible.

goal: Techniques for Checkpoint 1.1
http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG10-TECHS/#tech-text-equivalent > Long
Description of Images
http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG10-HTML-TECHS/#long-descriptions
* This one might be too complex for now - and goes beyond WAI site
navigation to WCAG10 navigation. If you try it, note particularly the
path they take and how useful the intro pages are at helping them
understand the WCAG 1.0 documents.

Task 7: Your company is revising the online forms on its Web site. Find
specific information on how to make the online forms accessible.

goal: forms section in HTML Techniques
http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG10-HTML-TECHS/#forms
* This one might be too complex for now - and goes beyond WAI site
navigation to WCAG10 navigation. If you try it, note particularly the
path they take and how useful the intro pages are at helping them
understand the WCAG 1.0 documents. Specifically, I'd like to know if
anyone sees and understands "The techniques documents are organized by
topic; for example, HTML Techniques includes sections on forms, images,
lists, links, tables, etc." :)

Task 8: You have been invited to be a presenter at a local conference on
Web accessibility. Find information on this Web site that you could use
in your talk.

goal: http://www.w3.org/2004/09/wai-nav/nav-train.html
* this is one I suspect will be much better than previous! :)

And a task that didn't make it into the study that would be good:

Task policies: A company with many global divisions and Web sites in
many languages has asked for your opinion on how Web accessibility laws
differ around the world. Using this Web site, determine whether or not
it contains relevant information.

goal: Home > Guidelines & Resources > General > Governmental Policies
Relating to Web Accessibility

Also, feel free to take any tasks from the Task Analysis list at:
http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/2003/tasks

Best,

~ Shawn


[1] active links from http://www.w3.org/2004/09/wai-nav/8-home:
- Getting Started
-- Introduction to Accessibility
-- Components
-- WAI Overview
- About WAI
- Guidelines & Resources
-- Guidelines & Techniques
--- Web Content WCAG
--- Authoring Tool ATAG
--- User Agent UAAG
---- UAAG Links http://www.w3.org/2004/09/wai-nav/uaag-links.html
----- http://www.w3.org/2004/09/wai-nav/uaag10-testimonials.html
----- http://www.w3.org/2004/09/wai-nav/uaag10-faq.html
-- General
-- Implementing
--- Business Case 
---- Social Factors
---- Technical Factors
---- Financial Factors
---- Legal & Policy Factors
-- Evaluating
-- Developing Training
- WAI Groups
-- Education & Outreach EOWG

[2] results: http://www.air.org/concord/wai/findings.html#tasks

[3] from WAI Web Site MITs / "Parking Lot"
http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/UCD/mits
Received on Tuesday, 26 October 2004 21:28:20 UTC

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