W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-vocabs@w3.org > October 2013

Re: Cascading Types in a Meta Tag

From: Dan Scott <dan@coffeecode.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2013 13:19:02 -0400
Message-ID: <CAJcoVMgFiJkQ4zSav-uOTki54QYDtU0bV0TE1Z61ALQjd9L3Wg@mail.gmail.com>
To: Robert Kost <rkost@thematix.com>
Cc: SchemaDot Org <public-vocabs@w3.org>
On Thu, Oct 24, 2013 at 9:50 AM, Robert Kost <rkost@thematix.com> wrote:
> Hi
>
> Dumb question #347:
>
> How does one nest RDFa type declarations in a <meta> tag?
>
> For example, the copyrightHolder of a CreativeWork is an Organization.
> Since the copyright holder isn’t explicitly stated on the page, it has to be
> declared in a <meta> tag.   But this doesn’t look right:
>
> <div id="namespaces" prefix="schema: http://schema.org/ “>
>
> <div typeof="schema:VideoObject”>
> <meta property="copyrightHolder" typeof="schema:Organization"
> property="name" content=“Some Company"/>
> ...
> </div>
> </div>
>
>
> I know this is elementary stuff, but a fair amount of googling around failed
> to provide an answer, so I look to someone here.
>

The best option would probably be to publish a URL about "Some
Company" that you could link to directly, for example:

<div vocab="http://schema.org/" typeof="VideoObject">
   <link property="copyrightHolder" href="http://example.com/some_company" />
</div>

That way you wouldn't have to bloat your markup with copies of
properties on every page, and updating info about "Some Company" would
be handled by changing a single page. But, I assume you've already
looked into that as an option, so if you have to go inline...

Nesting it in a span tag, with a meta tag inside, seems to work... for example:

<div vocab="http://schema.org/" typeof="VideoObject">
  <span property="copyrightHolder" typeof="Organization">
    <meta property="name" content="Some Company"/>
  </span>
</div>

Tested in http://rdfa.info/play and
http://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/richsnippets?q=uploaded:8004e97fb53580b319d78cd8b549a58b
for what that's worth.

Alternately, you could go beyond RDFa Lite and use the @about attribute like so:

<div vocab="http://schema.org/" typeof="VideoObject">
  <meta property="copyrightHolder" typeof="Organization" resource="#foobar">
  <meta property="name" content="Some Company" about="#foobar"/>
</div>

That tests out fine in http://rdfa.info/play but the Rich Snippets
tool doesn't like it very much, which isn't much of a surprise as
schema.org only declares support for RDFa Lite -- however, there are
certainly times I _wish_ @about was supported.
Received on Thursday, 24 October 2013 17:19:51 UTC

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