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Re: Yet Another LOD cloud browser

From: David Huynh <dfhuynh@alum.mit.edu>
Date: Sun, 17 May 2009 23:20:39 -0700
Message-ID: <4A10FE37.6030400@alum.mit.edu>
To: Sherman Monroe <sdmonroe@gmail.com>
CC: Linked Data community <public-lod@w3.org>, semantic-web@w3.org
Sherman Monroe wrote:
> Kingsley wrote:
>
>     There are half a dozen Entities across N graphs in the Quad Store.
>     The UI issue here is that we don't show the source Graphs in the
>     results page. Reason, we know we can actually provide distinct
>     results cheaper than listing the Graph Names etc..
>
>     Your timing is borderline impeccable, we will actually be
>     releasing the Distinct optimization that showcases what I mean.
>     Anyway, for now, when you select one of the Microsofts from
>     DBpedia graphs, click on the "Stats" link, it will give you a back
>     door view of where the data has come from.
>
>
> David, also keep in mind that this is one of the benefits of set-based 
> browsing. If I have a results set of twenty synonymous URIs 
> representing Microsoft, for someone researching Microsoft, such a list 
> would be a goldmine, because I can click razorbase -> Information and 
> view all information for all 20 versions of that one entity 
> simultaneously. In fact, when I get sparse results for an entity, I 
> always click the razorbase -> Information -> "Alternative Identities" 
> (e.g. owl:sameAs) and also I look under the reverse properties for the 
> same, to pull any alias that I may not be away of.
Hi Sherman,

I guess I'm just trying to close the gap between Google's search 
results--which people are familiar with--and  razorbase's or any novel 
search engine's results. For example, when I search for Microsoft on 
Google, the first result not only IS what I want, but also LOOKs like 
what I want. I can make the decision to click on it within maybe 1 or 2 
seconds. The URL "www.microsoft.com" in that search result is perhaps 
the most convincing element, as I know only *the* Microsoft can possibly 
own that domain. (This will be a challenge for any SW search engine, 
because no-one can own any URI, and so, seeing a URI alone means pretty 
much nothing. That's one of the main differences between URL and URI, 
which is usually swept under the rug.)

I believe that these "little details" play a big role in how users 
interact with SW search engines. It's not just that the search engine 
should return the right result, but that it should convince the user 
that the right result is right.

>     As always, enjoy chatting with you :-)
>
>
> Indeed, the LOD owes a lot to your work!!

Glad to have helped! :)

David
Received on Monday, 18 May 2009 06:21:21 UTC

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