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[ESW Wiki] Update of "its0908LinguisticMarkup" by GoutamSaha

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Date: Thu, 13 Oct 2005 01:25:23 -0000
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Dear Wiki user,

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The following page has been changed by GoutamSaha:
http://esw.w3.org/topic/its0908LinguisticMarkup


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  "The Chairman ''called off'' the meeting." is a group or phrasal verb. Other
  examples of ''group verbs'' are: turn up, put on, put off, get down, called on etc.
  A ''linking verb'' connects a subject and its complement. Sometimes called copulas, linking verbs are often forms of the verb to ''be''.  
+ A '''Finite Verb''' is one that has tense. Further, it has to agree with its subject in person and number, so its form changes accordingly: "She ''loves'' Paul.", "We ''love'' Ram." The subject and its finite verb depend on each other. A plural subject needs a plural verb. Similarly, a plural finite verb needs a plural subject. In other words, the relation between a subject and its finite verb is interdependent. A finite verb is an essential ingredient in a sentence. Even the simplest form requires Subject + Finite Verb to make a sentence: "Birds ''fly'' .", "Fire ''burns'' ." 
+ 
+ The forms of a '''Non-finite Verb''' is invariant because it is not affected by the (subject-verb) concord system: "He likes ''to swim'' .", "They like ''to swim'' .", "He likes ''eating'' .", " '''Having worked'' hard he felt tired." 
+ '''Non-finite verbs''' are not essential in a sentence. They are needed just to expand a sentence in order to express various kinds of meanings, so we cannot have a sentence with '' subject + non-finite verb '' without a finite verb. For example, we don't say: "Children '' to fly'' kites ."  Instead we say: "Children '' like '' to fly kites." Here, '' like '' is a finite verb and '' to fly '' is a non-finite verb. Non-finite verb has the structures: (i) '' to + verb '',
+ (ii) ''' Anaphoric to ''' (or ''' to ''' without verb, e.g., "Yes, I would love ''' to''' . " (the omitted verb after ''to '' say, "dance" is to be learnt through '''discourse analysis ''' ). ) '' 
  
  '''Noun:-'''
  ''A noun is a naming word.''
@@ -285, +290 @@

  =='''Understanding Sentence-Level Markups:-'''==
  
  A ''sentence'' is a set or group of words which makes complete sense. 
- ''Semantically'', '''Sentences''' are of major four kinds: (a) a ''Declarative or Assertive'' sentence (that makes a statement or assertion, e.g., ''He sat on a chair.''), (b) an ''Interrogative'' sentence (that asks a question, e.g., Where do you go ?) (c)an ''Imperative'' sentence (that expresses a command or an entreaty, e.g., Be quiet.), (d)an ''Exclamatory'' sentence (that expresses strong feeling, e.g., How cold the day is !).
+ '''Semantically Sentences ''' are of major four kinds: (a) a ''Declarative or Assertive'' sentence (that makes a statement or assertion, e.g., ''He sat on a chair.''), (b) an ''Interrogative'' sentence (that asks a question, e.g., Where do you go ?) (c)an ''Imperative'' sentence (that expresses a command or an entreaty, e.g., Be quiet.), (d)an ''Exclamatory'' sentence (that expresses strong feeling, e.g., How cold the day is !).
- Other semantic classifications of sentences are: (e) '''Praying Sentence''' expresses a prayer, e.g., "May God bless you." (f) '''Causative Sentence''' expresses a cause and effect or condition, e.g., "If you work hard you will definitely succeed." (g) '''Suspicion Sentence''' expresses a guessing or suspicion, e.g., "It might rain now." (h)'''Cursed Sentence''' expresses an imprecation, "You devil, get ruined." (i) '''Proverbial Sentence''' denotes a proverbial expression, e.g., "Cut your coat according to your cloth." "Grapes are sour."
+ Other semantic classifications of sentences are: (e) '''Praying Sentence''' expresses a prayer, e.g., "May God bless you." (f) '''Causative Sentence''' expresses a cause and effect or condition, e.g., "If you work hard you will definitely succeed." (g) '''Suspicion Sentence''' expresses a guessing or suspicion, e.g., "It might rain now." (h)'''Cursed Sentence''' expresses an imprecation, "You devil, get ruined." (i) '''Proverbial Sentence''' denotes a proverbial expression, e.g., "Cut your coat according to your cloth." "Grapes are sour." (j) '''Taunt Sentence''' expresses a jeering remark or sarcastic or derisive comment, e.g., "That penniless boy behaves as if he is a king."
  
  A sentence is diveded into two main parts- (a) the ''Subject'' (i.e., the person or thing about which something is said) and (b) the ''Predicate'' (i.e., what is said about the person or thing denoted by the subject.) The subject may consist of one word or several words. The predicate may also consist one or several words.  In other words, we must have a ''subject'' to speak about and we must ''say or predicate'' something about that subject. For an example, in the sentence "The sun gives light.", "The sun" is the ''subject'' and "gives light." is the ''predicate''.  
  
Received on Thursday, 13 October 2005 11:14:11 UTC

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