W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-html@w3.org > September 2009

Re: More on SVG within HTML pages

From: Boris Zbarsky <bzbarsky@MIT.EDU>
Date: Tue, 08 Sep 2009 13:21:33 -0400
Message-ID: <4AA6929D.50402@mit.edu>
To: Shelley Powers <shelleyp@burningbird.net>
CC: public-html@w3.org
Shelley Powers wrote:
> But I'm not sure that a typical user will use a new HTML5 enabled 
> browser right out of the box, either. The typical user is not an early 
> adopter.

No one is expecting them to do so.  But they should use it _sometime_, 
right?

> I think it's a dangerous precedent to get into removing features just 
> because _someone_ might screw up with them.

There is data showing people have already screwed up with <svg> in 
webpages, no?

Or are we talking about specifically the metadata container thing?

>> There are also such people, yes.  And then there are such people who 
>> have the browser changed for them by a friend and then complain that 
>> it doesn't work and want it changed back.
> 
> Sure, in which case they weren't ready to adopt a new browser in the 
> first place.

Most people are never ready by that definition.  And yet we want to move 
the web forward.  That implies making adoption of new browsers as 
minimally painful as possible.

> Other than reaching out, and slapping a person across the face, we can't 
> stop people from making copy and paste errors. If people leave the 
> important bits of SVG out of the copy and paste they will know it 
> immediately.

We can't stop them from making copy and paste errors, but we can make 
sure that if they make such an error any resulting bustage in HTML5 UAs 
will also be visible to them in non-HTML5 UAs.  Of course things might 
look busted in the latter even if they don't look in the former (e.g. 
the SVG won't show).  That's OK and comes with any use of new features.

-Boris
Received on Tuesday, 8 September 2009 17:22:27 GMT

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