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Re: cite element not for people's names?

From: Ben 'Cerbera' Millard <cerbera@projectcerbera.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2008 14:44:17 -0000
Message-ID: <008901c87498$3e876210$0301a8c0@ben9xr3up2lv7v>
To: "Karl Dubost" <karl@w3.org>
Cc: "HTMLWG" <public-html@w3.org>

Karl Dubost wrote:
> I guess a study of the patterns like the excellent work done on tables 
> would be very useful.

I failed at getting sponsorship quickly enough to help do more work like the 
tables study. I also failed at getting anyone to help with the studies. 
Despite using <strong>!

I've had to focus on making websites so I can pay bills, buy food and 
suchlike. I'd like to do more studies, though. How authors mark up table 
headers, how they attribute quotes to sources and how they make citations 
are just 3 of at least 26 specific authoring issues I want to study.

When my current website contracts are done, I plan on doing a new round of 
seeking sponsorship. Last time, I found  lots of moral support and a couple 
of invitations to apply for jobs. I didn't find a flow of money for me to do 
markup studies in a sustainable way, though.

Phillip Taylor's database can be browsed by markup:

* <http://canvex.lazyilluminati.com/survey/2007-07-17/analyse.cgi/index>
* <http://canvex.lazyilluminati.com/survey/2007-07-17/analyse.cgi/tag/cite>
* 
<http://canvex.lazyilluminati.com/survey/2007-07-17/analyse.cgi/tag/blockquote>

Brilliant for studying how authors use specific elements and specific 
attributes. You can see a list of pages using any specific element. But you 
don't see pages using different markup for that same type of content, which 
I think is just as useful for the design of HTML5.

--
Ben Millard, sdesign1
<http://www.sdesign1.co.uk/ben.htm> 
Received on Thursday, 21 February 2008 14:45:52 UTC

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