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Re: 3.11 Lists Review Comments (ol/@start, li/@value)

From: Simon Pieters <simonp@opera.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2007 19:29:55 +0200
To: "Dan Connolly" <connolly@w3.org>, "Debi Orton" <oradnio@gmail.com>
Cc: public-html@w3.org
Message-ID: <op.tvmdj5d3idj3kv@hp-a0a83fcd39d2>

On Tue, 17 Jul 2007 18:28:34 +0200, Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org> wrote:

>
> On Sun, 2007-07-15 at 23:43 -0400, Debi Orton wrote:
> [...]
>> Given that both the start attribute of the ol
>> element and the value attribute of the li element
>> were deprecated in HTML 4.01, what is the
>> compelling case for resurrecting them?

There is a thread on the WHATWG list discussing some use-cases, starting  
with  
http://lists.whatwg.org/pipermail/whatwg-whatwg.org/2006-June/006816.html

> It's not clear to me that they ever went away, in the minds
> of document authors and tool implementors.
>
> Perhaps the "Support Existing Content" proposed design
> principle makes the argument to your satisfaction?
>
> "Browsers implementing the new version of HTML should still be able to
> handle existing content. Ideally, it should be possible to process web
> documents and applications via an HTML5 implementation even if they were
> authored against older implementations and do not specifically request
> HTML5 processing."
>
>  -- http://esw.w3.org/topic/HTML/ProposedDesignPrinciples

AIUI, the question was about why the start and value attributes are  
considered conforming for authors to use, not why UAs have to implement  
them. The referenced design principle is about the latter.

> [...]
>

-- 
Simon Pieters
Opera Software
Received on Tuesday, 17 July 2007 17:30:17 UTC

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