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Re: Draft finding - "Transitioning the Web to HTTPS"

From: Eric J. Bowman <eric@bisonsystems.net>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:06:03 -0700
To: "Eric J. Bowman" <eric@bisonsystems.net>
Cc: Mark Watson <watsonm@netflix.com>, Henri Sivonen <hsivonen@hsivonen.fi>, Tim Berners-Lee <timbl@w3.org>, Public TAG List <www-tag@w3.org>
Message-Id: <20150128160603.948038bdf20cf82863f78be3@bisonsystems.net>
Eric J. Bowman wrote:
>
> Mark Watson wrote:
>
> >
> > You made a point about the legal status of the practice of
> > ad-insertion​, but that is not at issue here: in this forum we must
> > decide what are reasonable practices that should be protected /
> > maintained / alternatives found in the drive to improve security and
> > privacy on the web.
> >
> 
> And yet the uptake of any such decisions, at this point in the life of
> the Web, depend on the legal ramifications to the "long tail" of Web
> developers who aren't employed by multinational corporations. Which
> makes it a problem when those ramifications aren't discussed, or are
> dismissed on an assumption of illegality that isn't backed up by any
> legal precedent.
> 

My POV is the direct result of putting on my (ex-) ISP/Webhosting hats
for a moment. You're talking about my customers, here. While I've never
implemented anything in such fashion, I've resold services to plenty of
others that have. And guess who the ramifications fall to, to enforce?

If the future of the Web is telling a significant chunk of my customers
that I no longer welcome their custom unless they change their ways, of
*course* I'm going to be skeptical. Because they'll just go to a
competitor, and isn't avoiding that outcome the thrust of my business
in a high-churn environment?

Even if this POV is not well represented.

-Eric
Received on Wednesday, 28 January 2015 23:06:47 UTC

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