W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > w3c-wai-ig@w3.org > January to March 2018

RE: Assistive Technology Detection

From: Jonathan Avila <jon.avila@levelaccess.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2018 14:13:31 +0000
To: "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Message-ID: <BN6PR03MB2513A46468BD9F3F9F814D67F1FA0@BN6PR03MB2513.namprd03.prod.outlook.com>
> I've often said the the web was far more accessible 25yrs ago, the newer and fancier it gets the less accessible and the harder we have to work to keep it accessible.

Bob, perhaps it was more accessible to you but what about people with different types of disabilities? That may be your perspective, however, the technologies that we now have on the web allow for use of video to support sign language equivalents, allow USB authentication to support users with cognitive disabilities, support of different writing systems, availability of more graphical method such as icons with text for users with cognitive disabilities, etc. These new technologies have  great power to improve the web for other users with different types of disabilities and language systems.    Even the accessibility object model which will be coming in the near future has great value to benefit users of screen readers and other assistive technology.

Jonathan

-----Original Message-----
From: accessys@smart.net [mailto:accessys@smart.net] 
Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2018 5:44 PM
To: Sean Murphy (seanmmur)
Cc: Phill Jenkins; Mark Weiler; w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
Subject: RE: Assistive Technology Detection


I've often said the the web was far more accessible 25yrs ago, the newer and fancier it gets the less accessible and the harder we have to work to keep it accessible.

all of these "do it yourself" website builders seem to leave out accessibility.

Bob



On Tue, 30 Jan 2018, Sean Murphy (seanmmur) wrote:

> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2018 22:39:35 +0000
> From: "Sean Murphy (seanmmur)" <seanmmur@cisco.com>
> To: "accessys@smart.net" <accessys@smart.net>
> Cc: Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com>, Mark Weiler <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>,
>     "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
> Subject: RE: Assistive Technology Detection
> 
> The point I was making. If someone builds a web site using NodeJS, BootStrap or simular technology. Then accessibility is going to be a major headache for the developers with extra unrequired work to find solutions in relation to accesisbility. Focus must be placed on these type of development tools to have accessibility baked within the tool environment to improve software. As some of the tech articles I have read indicates this is going to become the norm, rather than the exception. Some of the newer tools out there are going to be even less code base focus. Therefore the author (developer) of the web site might not necessarily have deep coding skills.
>
>
>
>
>
> Sean Murphy
> ENGINEER.CUSTOMER SUPPORT
> seanmmur@cisco.com
> Tel: +61 2 8446 7751
>
> Cisco Systems, Inc.
> The Forum 201 Pacific Highway
> ST LEONARDS
> 2065
> Australia
> cisco.com
>
> Think before you print.
> This email may contain confidential and privileged material for the sole use of the intended recipient. Any review, use, distribution or disclosure by others is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient (or authorized to receive for the recipient), please contact the sender by reply email and delete all copies of this message.
> http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/about/legal/terms-sale-software-license-a
> greement/company-registration-information.html
> -----Original Message-----
> From: accessys@smart.net [mailto:accessys@smart.net]
> Sent: Wednesday, 31 January 2018 7:27 AM
> To: Sean Murphy (seanmmur) <seanmmur@cisco.com>
> Cc: Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com>; Mark Weiler 
> <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>; w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
> Subject: RE: Assistive Technology Detection
>
>
> the only really sound foundational tool that I have found is the open 
> source eMACspeak which while very powerful is also unfortunately very 
> complex to learn and use.
>   however once proficient (which unfortunately I cannot say I am) on 
> can take a blank computer out of the box and program it completely 
> using nothing but this software and a voice output device.  no 
> assistance of any kind needed, I have seen this done, it does work best in linux.
>
> if there is any other decent package avaliable I am unaware of it.
> unfortunately  there is very little other decent open source AT 
> software avaliable for any platform. although there are a few projects 
> underway on the Linux OS none are very robust at this time
>
> ORCA (a sort of JAWS light) does come in many linux OS packages
>
> Bob
>
>
> On Tue, 30 Jan 2018, Sean Murphy (seanmmur) wrote:
>
>> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2018 10:27:34 +0000
>> From: "Sean Murphy (seanmmur)" <seanmmur@cisco.com>
>> To: Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com>, Mark Weiler 
>> <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>
>> Cc: "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
>> Subject: RE: Assistive Technology Detection
>> Resent-Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2018 10:28:43 +0000
>> Resent-From: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
>>
>> All,
>>
>> This is a very important and valuable discussion. One part of the puzzle which I feel is missing and is foundational in my thinking. Is the development environment.
>>
>> To many development tools do not have accessibility built into them. Many discussions over the years have been focused on this with very little change. If the tools do not include accessibility in their UI, then you have problems regardless of the design and intention of the organisation.
>>
>> The concept I used, if you design the best house and build a substandard foundation. Then your fantastic house will have some serious structural problems. UX designers do get the concept. Developers get the concept. But the development tools fail in relation to accessibility. I regard the development tools as the foundation of your product. The developer and UX/UI designers are the design part of the house.
>>
>> Linking this back to the thread. if the foundation of the product had accessibility built in. then there is no need to know what assistive technology is being used. As the user will get the same experience as all other users. At least this is the goal.
>>
>>
>> Leveraging off what already has bene discussed on the thread. Accessibility has to be core in any software product regardless if it is web, desktop, mobile or whatever. Thus why the discovery and design stage is so important.
>>
>> [https://www.cisco.com/c/dam/m/en_us/signaturetool/images/banners/sta
>> ndard/08_standard_graphic.png]
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sean Murphy
>> ENGINEER.CUSTOMER SUPPORT
>> seanmmur@cisco.com<mailto:seanmmur@cisco.com>
>> Tel: +61 2 8446 7751
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Cisco Systems, Inc.
>> The Forum 201 Pacific Highway
>> ST LEONARDS
>> 2065
>> Australia
>> cisco.com
>>
>>
>>
>> [http://www.cisco.com/assets/swa/img/thinkbeforeyouprint.gif]
>>
>> Think before you print.
>>
>> This email may contain confidential and privileged material for the sole use of the intended recipient. Any review, use, distribution or disclosure by others is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient (or authorized to receive for the recipient), please contact the sender by reply email and delete all copies of this message.
>> Please click here<http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/about/legal/terms-sale-software-license-agreement/company-registration-information.html> for Company Registration Information.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> From: Phill Jenkins [mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com]
>> Sent: Tuesday, 30 January 2018 5:12 PM
>> To: Mark Weiler <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>
>> Cc: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org
>> Subject: Re: Assistive Technology Detection
>>
>> the way to make it a reality is to simply follow the guidance in the link Mark providerUnderstanding Accessibility Support<https://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/conformance.html#uc-accessibility-support-head>:
>> "When new technologies are introduced, two things must happen in order for people using assistive technologies to be able to access them. First, the technologies must be designed in a way that user agents including assistive technologies could access all the information they need to present the content to the user. Secondly, the user agents and assistive technologies may need to be redesigned or modified to be able to actually work with these new technologies.
>>
>> "Accessibility Supported" means that both of these have been done and that the technology will work with user agents and assistive technologies."
>>
>>
>> Clearly there has to be acceptance that user agents and assistive technology may need to be redesigned or modified to be able to actually work with new technologies.  Is WAI-ARIA an example of a new technlolgy designed in a way that user agents *could* access all the information they need to present the content to the user - yes I believe there is general consensus.  Did user agents and assistive technologies get redesigned and modified to be able to *actually* work with WAI-ARIA - yes I believe there is general consensus.  So WAI-ARIA is an example of a new technology that is actually accessibility supported in at least English and other languages, on the Windows and other platforms, in Firefox and other browsers, and NVDA, JAWS and other assistive technologies.
>>
>> So, going back to Mark's original question:
>> "Related to AT detection is how can a site or app know what web content technologies to serve up that are accessibly supported without knowing the user agents and AT the user is using?"
>>
>> The site doesn't need to know which AT is being used by the user at the exact time the page is loading, but that the site or app *can* know what web content technologies to serve up by knowing which ones are supported *if* there are user agents and AT that support it - then it *will* work - becasue it has been tested to validate so.  The Understanding WCAG document goes on to say that there is a need for an external and international dialogue on this topic. Some notes to help in understanding and exploring this topic:
>>
>> 1.        Accessibility support of Web technologies varies by environment
>>
>>  *   Web technologies may only need to be supported by those specific user agents and assistive technologies deployed at a company. (These may be older versions of user agents and assistive technologies or the very newest versions).
>>  *   Content posted to the public Web may need to work with a broader range of user agents and assistive technologies, including older versions.
>> 2.        Accessibility support of Web technologies varies by language (and dialect)
>>
>>  *   There are different levels of older assistive technologies support in different languages and even countries. Some environments or countries may provide free assistive technologies.
>> 3.        New technologies won't be supported in older assistive technologies
>>
>>  *   Clearly, a new technology cannot be supported by all past assistive technologies, so requiring that a technology be supported by all assistive technologies is not possible.
>> 4.        Support for a single older assistive technology is usually not sufficient
>>
>>  *   Support by just one assistive technology (for a given disability) would not usually be enough, especially if most users who need it in order to access content do not have and cannot afford that assistive technology. The exception here would be information distributed to company employees only where they all have one assistive technology (of that type).
>> 5.        Currently assistive technology that is affordable by the general public is often very poor
>>
>>  *   Creating content that can't be used by the general public with disabilities should be avoided. In many cases, the cost of assistive technologies is too high for users who need it. Also, the capabilities of free or low cost AT is often so poor today that Web content cannot be realistically restricted to this lowest (or even middle) common denominator. This creates a very difficult dilemma that needs to be addressed.
>>
>> And then the Understanding WCAG document includes Examples of Conformance Claims<https://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/complete-diff.html#uc-examples-head>that list
>>        - the technologies that this content "relies upon" is: blah blah blah
>>        - the content was tested using the following user agents and 
>> assistive technologies: blah blah blah
>>
>> So, the web site owner *can* document a claim (but doesn't have to document the claim per WCAG) how they validated (or tested or determined or what ever English phrase they want to use) it confoms to the success criteria.  The Information Industry Technology Council (see https://www.itic.org/policy/accessibility) includes a section in the Voluntary Product Accessibility Template«, or VPAT« 2.0for reporting conformance:
>> ". . . 4.        A report must contain the following content at a minimum:
>> *        . . . Evaluation Methods Used - Include a description of what evaluation methods were used to complete the VPAT for the product under test.. . .
>> ITI suggests that authors adopt the following best practices when using the VPAT«to create an Accessibility Conformance Report. . . .
>> *        Evaluation Methods Used - Information to enter may include the following:
>> *        Testing is based on general product knowledge
>> *        Similar to another evaluated product
>> *        Testing with assistive technologies
>> *        Published test method (provide name, publisher, URL link)
>> *        Vendor proprietary test method
>> *        Other test method "
>> Even after all this designing with users and testing with browsers and assistive technologies and documenting the conformance, there still can be a delimina, as I try to remind Bob and others [quoting from the 2017 Understanding Accessibility Support<https://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/conformance.html#uc-accessibility-support-head>] that the capabilities of free or low cost AT is often so poor today that Web content cannot be realistically restricted to this lowest (or even middle) common denominator. This creates a very difficult dilemma that needs to be addressed.
>> I believe this *is* being address by non-profit organizations, governments, corporations, and other initiatives that are providing "1st Class" low cost internet access, assistive technologies, and funded research:
>>        organizations such as Benetech, technology for social good at https://benetech.org/,
>>        governments such as the U.S.'s NIDILRR<https://www.acl.gov/about-acl/about-national-institute-disability-independent-living-and-rehabilitation-research>
>>        corporations such asIBM's Corporate Responsibility<https://www.ibm.com/ibm/responsibility/?lnk=fab>,and Apple's (VoiceOver) and Microsoft's inclusion of assistive technologies for no additional cost in the platform,
>>        initiatives such as Google.org Impact Challenge https://www.google.org/our-work/google-impact-challenge/
>>        and all the efforts in closing the digital divide through 
>> improving affordable access 
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_divide#Overcoming_the_divide
>> ___________
>> Regards,
>> Phill Jenkins
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> From:        Mark Weiler <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca<mailto:mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>>
>> To:        Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>>, "accessys@smart.net<mailto:accessys@smart.net>" <accessys@smart.net<mailto:accessys@smart.net>>
>> Cc:        "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>>
>> Date:        01/29/2018 07:46 PM
>> Subject:        Re: Assistive Technology Detection
>> ________________________________
>>
>>
>>
>> I hope a productive conversation can continue.  The WCAG Working Group see conversations around levels of "accessibility supported" as necessary and complex (see the section under the heading "Level of Assistive Technology Support Needed for 'Accessibility Support'<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.w3.org_TR_UNDERSTANDING-2DWCAG20_conformance.html-23uc-2Daccessibility-2Dsupport-2Dhead&d=DwMFaQ&c=jf_iaSHvJObTbx-siA1ZOg&r=aWgRqmoh0Xuzjf7UaXq44Tf6K41u809DPE44ioVTOvk&m=I1O2ZAgFrv7IGd5ZUe4eQIC1pLLvsIbVWkcR3c7UcRU&s=RECn_HIUpoUnb4nHeDntOs0rvP1a423o_JMY8UCEXWU&e=>"). Item 5 in the list addresses Bob's point and Phil's number 4. Can anyone add more to the discussion?
>>
>> What's the way to make "accessibility supported" a reality?
>>
>>
>>
>> On Monday, January 29, 2018 2:31 PM, Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> but Bob,
>> there are so many things we do agree on though, like 1. Web 
>> applications should be developed to accommodate assistive technology 
>> without the web application knowing if the user is using assistive technology.
>> 2. Web application should comply with WCAG 2.0 Level A and AA Success Criteria.
>> 3. Internet access should be affordable to everyone.
>> 4. Assistive Technology should be affordable to everyone.
>> ___________
>> Regards,
>> Phill Jenkins
>> Check out the new system for requesting an IBM product Accessibility 
>> Conformance Report VPAT«at  
>> able.ibm.com/request<https://able.ibm.com/request/>
>> pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>
>> Senior Engineer & Accessibility Executive IBM Research Accessibility 
>> linkedin.com/in/philljenkins/<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/ur
>> l?u=https-3A__www.linkedin.com_in_philljenkins_&d=DwMFaQ&c=jf_iaSHvJO
>> bTbx-siA1ZOg&r=aWgRqmoh0Xuzjf7UaXq44Tf6K41u809DPE44ioVTOvk&m=I1O2ZAgF
>> rv7IGd5ZUe4eQIC1pLLvsIbVWkcR3c7UcRU&s=tVanUnXDHw4vV7Tt3MJ4qRhq0ne5lAn
>> nQXbmuxVlMHQ&e=> ibm.com/able<http://www.ibm.com/able>
>> facebook.com/IBMAccessibility<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/ur
>> l?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_IBMAccessibility&d=DwMFaQ&c=jf_iaSHvJOb
>> Tbx-siA1ZOg&r=aWgRqmoh0Xuzjf7UaXq44Tf6K41u809DPE44ioVTOvk&m=I1O2ZAgFr
>> v7IGd5ZUe4eQIC1pLLvsIbVWkcR3c7UcRU&s=m-TdSixpaUKCXH4ZchGgUEk2sx4bbLYF
>> M0AdqGup3pY&e=> 
>> twitter.com/IBMAccess<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http
>> s-3A__twitter.com_IBMAccess&d=DwMFaQ&c=jf_iaSHvJObTbx-siA1ZOg&r=aWgRq
>> moh0Xuzjf7UaXq44Tf6K41u809DPE44ioVTOvk&m=I1O2ZAgFrv7IGd5ZUe4eQIC1pLLv
>> sIbVWkcR3c7UcRU&s=GCaL9_C8S9y6Ve3Kq-Ak1be9ErphiIsH4B-zkDNYvkE&e=>
>> ageandability.com
>>
>>
>>
>> From:        accessys@smart.net<mailto:accessys@smart.net>
>> To:        Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>>
>> Cc:        Mark Weiler <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca<mailto:mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>>, "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>" <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>>
>> Date:        01/29/2018 09:52 AM
>> Subject:        Re: Assistive Technology Detection
>> ________________________________
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> we have disagreed (agreeably) about this for some years I doubt 
>> neither of us will change the others mind much.  parking is more like 
>> powering down the computer not using it.
>>
>> Bob
>>
>>
>> On Mon, 29 Jan 2018, Phill Jenkins wrote:
>>
>>> Date: Mon, 29 Jan 2018 09:27:31 -0600
>>> From: Phill Jenkins 
>>> <pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>>
>>> To: accessys@smart.net<mailto:accessys@smart.net>
>>> Cc: Mark Weiler <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca<mailto:mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>>,
>>>     "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>" 
>>> <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>>
>>> Subject: Re: Assistive Technology Detection
>>>
>>> come on Bob, no one, including me, is arguing for a Lexus to be 
>>> required to drive down an ADA compliant highway.
>>> but to use a highway, you do have to have a car that can go the 
>>> minimum speed, 45 mph I think, and meet all the safety standards, right?
>>>
>>> I simply said that ADA technical standards cover both the larger Van 
>>> Accessible parking spot - and - also cover what is a smaller regular 
>>> accessible parking spot.  The ADA doesn't require the parking lot 
>>> owner to provide/pay for the Van, or the car, to use the accessible parking spot.
>>> The specs were developed to meet the common sizes (but not 100%) of 
>>> accessible vans, If you have an accessible van the size of a small 
>>> motor home, it may not fit.  If the user needs or wants an 
>>> accessible van, it is not the parking lot owners responsibility to 
>>> provide the van.  The parking lot owner only has to provide a 
>>> certain number of the two different sized parking spaces in their parking lot.
>>>
>>> I provided this analogy as an example of claiming technical 
>>> compliance to WCAG 2.0 Success Criteria.  If the web site owner 
>>> provides a website that is supported by ARIA supported assistive 
>>> technologies, then it meets the technical standard.
>>>
>>> If you disagree with the analogy as an example, then we can agree to 
>>> disagree.
>>> ___________
>>> Regards,
>>> Phill Jenkins
>>> Check out the new system for requesting an IBM product Accessibility 
>>> Conformance Report VPAT« at  able.ibm.com/request 
>>> pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>
>>> Senior Engineer & Accessibility Executive IBM Research Accessibility 
>>> linkedin.com/in/philljenkins/
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> From:   accessys@smart.net<mailto:accessys@smart.net>
>>> To:     Mark Weiler <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca<mailto:mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>>
>>> Cc:     Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>>, "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>"
>>> <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>>
>>> Date:   01/26/2018 01:11 PM
>>> Subject:        Re: Assistive Technology Detection
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> and phill's argument falls apart at this point.
>>>
>>> eg   we have a highway and anyone with a Lexus can drive on it.  so it is
>>> open to anyone just go buy a Lexus.
>>>
>>> Bob
>>>
>>>
>>> On Fri, 26 Jan 2018, Mark Weiler wrote:
>>>
>>>> Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2018 17:42:13 +0000 (UTC)
>>>> From: Mark Weiler 
>>>> <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca<mailto:mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>>
>>>> To: Phill Jenkins <pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>>
>>>> Cc: "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>" 
>>>> <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>>
>>>> Subject: Re: Assistive Technology Detection
>>>> Resent-Date: Fri, 26 Jan 2018 17:42:47 +0000
>>>> Resent-From: w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> My reading of the WCAG 2.0's Understanding document is the working 
>>>> group
>>> interprets the issue of affordability within the requirement of 
>>> 'accessibility supported'. To quote:┬
>>>> "This topic raises the question of how many or which assistive
>>> technologies must support a Web technology in order for that Web 
>>> technology to be considered "accessibility supported".. ..This is a 
>>> complex topic and one that varies both by environment and by language.
>>> There is a need for an external and international dialogue on this topic.
>>> Some notes to help in understanding and exploring this topic are...
>>>> Currently assistive technology that is affordable by the general 
>>>> public
>>> is often very poor... In many cases, the cost of assistive 
>>> technologies is too high for users who need it... [emphasis added]
>>>> The Working Group, therefore, limited itself to defining what
>>> constituted support and defers the judgment of how much, how many, 
>>> or which AT must support a technology to the community and to 
>>> entities closer to each situation that set requirements for an 
>>> organization, purchase, community, etc.
>>>> The Working Group encourages more discussion of this topic in the
>>> general forum of society since this lack of generally available yet 
>>> robust assistive technologies is a problem that affects users, 
>>> technology developers and authors negatively."
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>    On Friday, January 26, 2018 12:11 PM, Phill Jenkins
>>> <pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> | . . . Ibelieve part 2.d addresses Bob's point about poverty levels. .
>>> .
>>>>
>>>> hmm, not the way Iinterpret Bob's comments over the years. ┬ For
>>> example, quoting 2.dTheuser agent(s) that support the technology are 
>>> accessibility supported andare available for download or purchase in 
>>> a way
>>> that:
>>>>   - does not cost a person with a disabilityany more than a person
>>> without a disability┬ and
>>>>   - is as easy to find and obtain for a personwith a disability as 
>>>> it is
>>> for a person without disabilities.
>>>> doesnot address "afordability", but does address equal costs 
>>>> andequal
>>> availability. ┬ If a $900 laptop, with the latest operating 
>>> system,browser and AT (such as free NVDA) is equally the same costs 
>>> and equallyavailable in the English language in the neighboor store 
>>> ┬ - then itis understood to be "accessibility supported". ┬
>>>>
>>>> Bob, correct meif I'm wrong, but Bob is talking about how some 
>>>> users
>>> with disabilitiescan't afford the $900 lapttop, so they can't afford 
>>> to upgrade to the latestARIA supported technologies for example. ┬ 
>>> The solution is the samecost and same availability to both the user 
>>> with a disability and the personwithout disabilities. ┬ And while it 
>>> is equally expensive to both aswell, it is equally compliant (or can 
>>> be) to standards and equally usableto both . ┬
>>>>
>>>> WCAG standardsdo not and should not address affordability in my opinion.
>>> ┬ Othermechanism do and should address affordability. ┬ And, for 
>>> example,neither does or should ADA standards cover the affordability 
>>> ofan accessible van in defining the number of van accessible parking 
>>> spotsthere needs to be in a parking lot, it does not cover the 
>>> affordabilitywhen considering the width and spacing of a van 
>>> accessible parking spot.┬ And there are considerations in the 
>>> standards that are "determined"by the AT it self, such as the Van 
>>> Accessible specs are wider, etc. thanregular car accessible spots. ┬  
>>> Similar to how now ARIA is supportedby platforms and assistive 
>>> technology - so it can be considered in theclaim that it is accessibility supported.
>>>> ┬ ___________
>>>> Regards,
>>>> Phill Jenkins
>>>> Check out the newsystem for requesting an IBM product Accessibility
>>> Conformance Report VPAT®at  able.ibm.com/request
>>>> pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>
>>>> SeniorEngineer & Accessibility Executive IBM Research Accessibility 
>>>> linkedin.com/in/philljenkins/
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> From:┬  ┬  ┬  ┬ MarkWeiler 
>>>> <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca<mailto:mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>>
>>>> To:┬  ┬  ┬  ┬ PhillJenkins 
>>>> <pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>>
>>>> Cc:┬  ┬  ┬  ┬ DavidWoolley 
>>>> <forums@david-woolley.me.uk<mailto:forums@david-woolley.me.uk>>,
>>> "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>"<w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mail
>>> to:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>>
>>>> Date:┬  ┬  ┬  ┬ 01/26/201802:52 AM
>>>> Subject:┬  ┬  ┬  ┬ Re:Assistive Technology Detection
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Phil, (Bob)
>>>>
>>>> My reading of the WCAG2.0 documents is that "conformance claims" 
>>>> can
>>> involve statingweb technologies relied upon but these "conformance claims"
>>> areoptional. ┬ Conformance itself, however, has 5 required parts, 
>>> withpart
>>> 4 requiring web content to only rely on accessibly supported 
>>> contentto meet the success criteria ("Only 
>>> accessibility-supportedways of using technologiesare reliedupon to 
>>> satisfythe success criteria.") ┬
>>>>
>>>>> From the referencedocument,it seem that AT's and user agents 
>>>>> determine
>>> whether something is accessibilitysupported or not: "a Web content 
>>> technology is 'accessibility supported'when users' assistive 
>>> technologies will work with the Web technologiesAND when the 
>>> accessibility features of mainstream technologies willwork with the 
>>> technology" (caps and emphasis in the original).
>>>>
>>>> The technicaldefinition of accessibility-supportedhas two parts and 
>>>> I
>>> believe part 2.d addresses Bob's point about povertylevels, as do 
>>> other parts in the reference document.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Thursday, January25, 2018 10:42 PM, Phill Jenkins
>>> <pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> | howcan a site or app know
>>>> | what web content technologies to serve up that are accessibly 
>>>> | supported without knowing the user agents and AT the user is 
>>>> | using? ┬
>>>>
>>>> My understanding is that for a site or app to claim conformance, 
>>>> the
>>> claimanthas to know or the claim has to state which accessibility 
>>> supported technologieswere relied upon in the conformance testing, 
>>> not in what the user is usingafter the conformance testing is done. 
>>> ┬ Of course what users actuallyuse significantly influences what are 
>>> the definitive list of accessibilitysupported technologies. ┬ There 
>>> is no requirement to "serve upthat technology" to claim conformance.
>>>>
>>>> For example, if the operating system and browser platform support
>>> highcontrast technology, the claim can be made that the site or app 
>>> conforms(or still conforms) with all the WCAG Success Criteria when 
>>> the user isrelying on those accessibility supported features in the 
>>> operating systemand browser platform. ┬ The site or app conformance 
>>> would fail if
>>> the1.3.1 Info and relationship success criteria fails because some 
>>> labelsor headings "disappeared" when turning on the high contrast 
>>> accessibilityfeatures supported in the OS & Browser.
>>>> ___________
>>>> Regards,
>>>> Phill Jenkins
>>>> pjenkins@us.ibm.com<mailto:pjenkins@us.ibm.com>
>>>> Senior Engineer & Accessibility Executive IBM Research 
>>>> Accessibility linkedin.com/in/philljenkins/
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> From: ┬  ┬  ┬  ┬ MarkWeiler 
>>>> <mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca<mailto:mweiler@alumni.sfu.ca>>
>>>> To: ┬  ┬  ┬  ┬ DavidWoolley 
>>>> <forums@david-woolley.me.uk<mailto:forums@david-woolley.me.uk>>,
>>> "w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mailto:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>"<w3c-wai-ig@w3.org<mail
>>> to:w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>>
>>>> Date: ┬  ┬  ┬  ┬ 01/25/201806:52 PM
>>>> Subject: ┬  ┬  ┬  ┬ Re:Assistive Technology Detection
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Related to AT detection is how can a site or app know what web
>>> contenttechnologies to serve up that are accessibly supported 
>>> without knowingthe user agents and AT the user is using? ┬
>>>>
>>>> Accessibility supported is a requirementfor conformance. ┬
>>> Andresearchfindingsshow differences inhow browsers and ATs are 
>>> supporting web content technologies.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Thursday, January 25, 2018 7:08 PM, David Woolley
>>> <forums@david-woolley.me.uk<mailto:forums@david-woolley.me.uk>>wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The dangers I see are:
>>>>
>>>> 1) this will reinforce the idea that the only disabled people are 
>>>> those that use JAWs.
>>>>
>>>> 2) it will probably have a similar effect to early mobile web 
>>>> sites, which tended to be cleaner, and easier to use that the main web site.
>>>> That may mean that the main web site gets more difficult to use, 
>>>> and you won't be able to do the equivalent of using wap instead of www.
>>>>
>>>> On 25/01/18 19:18, accessys@smart.netwrote<mailto:accessys@smart.netwrote>:
>>>>>
>>>>> counter to concept of accessibility, one should not need to 
>>>>> identify and personally I would be ,opposed to it.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
Received on Thursday, 1 February 2018 14:29:52 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Thursday, 1 February 2018 14:29:53 UTC