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Re: JAWS privacy

From: Jim Allan <jimallan@tsbvi.edu>
Date: Tue, 22 May 2018 16:25:11 -0500
Message-ID: <CA+=z1W=e-N18q5jrWm7y+4gXnkfGCySjOxQz_z7jGEDQTMP08g@mail.gmail.com>
To: emily.ogle27@yahoo.com
Cc: michael.gower@ca.ibm.com, WAI-IG <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
Emily,
you use them (Dragon and Steno Mask) together.
https://talktech.com/stenomask-steno-sr/ about $220-290 depending on
features.
or
http://www.martelelectronics.com/stenomask-mini-microphones-for-court-reporters/
less than $200

On Tue, May 22, 2018 at 4:17 PM Emily Ogle <emily.ogle27@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Thank you all.
>
> Just curious if anyone has numbers on the steno mask. Do people use it as
> intended? Seems a steno mask would be cheaper than Dragon Medical (yikes).
>
> On Tuesday, May 22, 2018, 4:00:00 PM CDT, Jim Allan <jimallan@tsbvi.edu>
> wrote:
>
>
> Hi,
> Michael nailed the screen reader part.
> for speech input some type of "steno mask" -   a hand-held microphone
> built into a padded, sound-proof enclosure that fits over the speaker's
> mouth or nose and mouth. (wikipedia)
> would be necessary. They block outside noise, and hide what the user is
> saying.
>
> Jim
>
>
> On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 8:28 AM Michael Gower <michael.gower@ca.ibm.com>
> wrote:
>
> I'm assuming you are strictly addressing the issue of audio being heard by
> others. In most situations, a headset is all you need for JAWS users.
> (Since a refreshable Braille arguably decreases privacy less than inform
> being displayed on a screen, I think it can be ignored in this question.)
> Speech recognition is unlikely to be addressed by anything less than
> someone having a semi-private environment for entering sensitive personal
> information (SPI). Whether speech recognition *decreases* privacy is
> going to depend on the environment. In example, a patient medical history
> that involves some SPI such as a patient's DOB and health number is
> typically taken in a public space in emergency rooms. The
> reception/admission area may be somewhat removed from seating areas in an
> attempt to offer some privacy. But realistically, until a patient is put
> into a private room, privacy in a hospital environment is not really
> afforded with the curtains that partition emergency beds and shared rooms.
>
> Michael Gower
> IBM Accessibility
> Research
>
> 1803 Douglas Street, Victoria, BC  V8T 5C3
> gowerm@ca.ibm.com
> cellular: (250) 661-0098 *  fax: (250) 220-8034
>
>
>
> From:        Emily Ogle <emily.ogle27@yahoo.com>
> To:        WAI Interest Group <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
> Date:        2018-05-14 07:46 AM
> Subject:        JAWS privacy
> ------------------------------
>
>
>
> Hello everyone,
>
> I work in Healthcare IT and we've had some questions around how to protect
> patient privacy when someone is using JAWS. What are some strategies you've
> all used? Would headphones be as simple as it needs to be? Additionally,
> what are some ways we can protect patient information when using Speech
> recognition software, such as Dragon?
>
> Appreciate any insights this group has!
>
> Emily Ogle
> Cerner Corporation
> emily.ogle@cerner.com
>
>
>
>
> --
> Jim Allan, Accessibility Coordinator
> Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
> 1100 W. 45th St., Austin, Texas 78756
> voice 512.206.9315    fax: 512.206.9452 http://www.tsbvi.edu/
> "We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us." McLuhan, 1964
>


-- 
Jim Allan, Accessibility Coordinator
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired
1100 W. 45th St., Austin, Texas 78756
voice 512.206.9315    fax: 512.206.9452 http://www.tsbvi.edu/
"We shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us." McLuhan, 1964
Received on Tuesday, 22 May 2018 21:25:53 UTC

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