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Re: Seeking feedback on IAAP certification roadmap

From: Paul Bohman <paul.bohman@deque.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2014 11:07:12 -0400
Message-ID: <CA+20umEDamn4-Sg1J1haRS=UEMHX8EQKC7wsVnK6HmWzRXh36w@mail.gmail.com>
To: David Hilbert Poehlman <poehlman1@comcast.net>
Cc: "J. Albert Bowden" <jalbertbowden@gmail.com>, W3C WAI ig <w3c-wai-ig@w3.org>
In some ways, the concern that employers will use the lack of certification
"against you" might be a valid concern under some circumstances. But here's
how I see it playing out:

It will take time to develop, test, and deploy the certification assessment
and process. Let's say it takes 2 years to do that. That's just a guess,
not based on any actual timelines, but I know that it will take a long time
and a lot of work. In the meantime, there is no certification option at
all, so no one is going to require it.

When the certification debuts, most employers are not going to immediately
require it, simply because certification is new. It will take time for the
certification to gain traction, and most of that traction will depend on
whether people in the field feel that the certification is valuable:
whether or not the certification is a good measurement of a person's
accessibility skills. If we create a certification that isn't a valid
measurement, then it will mean nothing, and no one will require it, and the
certification itself will eventually fail. Obviously, we don't want to do
that. We want to create a valid certification that people in the field
respect. Certification will never be a substitute for real world
experience, but it can be a good benchmark of at least some kinds of skills.

Assuming that the certification gains respect, employers will begin to ask
for it in job applications, but most likely they won't require it. They'll
say something like "IAAP certification or equivalent experience." Maybe 5
or 10 years or so after certification is introduced some employers will
start to require it, and most other employers will continue to accept
experience as a substitute for certification.

In the meantime, those who want to improve their marketability as job
applicants will likely begin to take the certification exam as a way to
differentiate themselves from the competition. Mostly these will be people
new to the field, as the seasoned experts will point to their resume
instead of their certification. Those who are new to the field will have to
study for the exam to pass it. It will be a somewhat challenging process,
and the process will bring them up to speed and make them better fit for
employment. It will improve the pool of applicants. And that's good for
everybody.

That's how I see things playing out.


Paul Bohman, PhD
Director of Training
Deque Systems, Inc
www.deque.com
703-225-0380, ext.121


On Wed, Apr 9, 2014 at 10:35 AM, David Hilbert Poehlman <
poehlman1@comcast.net> wrote:

> Employers will use the lack of certification against us in the field
>
>
> --
> Jonnie Appleseed
> with his
> Hands-On Technolog(eye)s
> touching the internet
> Reducing technologeyes' disabilities
> one byte at a time
>
> On Apr 9, 2014, at 10:02, Paul Bohman <paul.bohman@deque.com> wrote:
>
> David, tell me what you mean about this posing a problem for employment.
> The intent is actually the opposite. Certification can open up new areas
> for employment. But tell us what you're thinking here, so I know what your
> concerns are.
>
>
> Paul Bohman, PhD
> Director of Training
> Deque Systems, Inc
> www.deque.com
> 703-225-0380, ext.121
>
>
> On Wed, Apr 9, 2014 at 3:07 AM, David Hilbert Poehlman <
> poehlman1@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> I can see how this might pose problems for people getting employed in the
>> accessibility field
>>
>>
>> --
>> Jonnie Appleseed
>> with his
>> Hands-On Technolog(eye)s
>>  touching the internet
>> Reducing technologeyes' disabilities
>> one byte at a time
>>
>> On Apr 8, 2014, at 19:55, Paul Bohman <paul.bohman@deque.com> wrote:
>>
>> Yes, as with nearly all professional certifications, a fee will be
>> associated with IAAP certification, though the amount of the fee has not
>> yet been set.
>>
>> The IAAP needs to financially support its own activities in order to
>> ensure the long-term viability of the IAAP itself. And members of the IAAP
>> are aware that certification costs need to be reasonable. We'll have to
>> balance both of those needs when we set the price.
>>
>>
>> Paul Bohman, PhD
>> Director of Training
>> Deque Systems, Inc
>> www.deque.com
>> 703-225-0380, ext.121
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Apr 8, 2014 at 7:47 PM, J. Albert Bowden <jalbertbowden@gmail.com
>> > wrote:
>>
>>> does it cost money to get certified?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Tue, Apr 8, 2014 at 1:15 PM, Paul Bohman <paul.bohman@deque.com>wrote:
>>>
>>>> Cross posted request for feedback:
>>>>
>>>> The International Association of Accessibility Professionals (IAAP)
>>>> needs your feedback on our roadmap for accessibility certification. Here is
>>>> the roadmap as it stands now:
>>>>
>>>> http://www.accessibilityassociation.org/content.asp?contentid=163
>>>>
>>>> We are still in the early stages of designing the certification, so
>>>> your feedback is most valuable now, before we commit to a certain path.
>>>>
>>>> Here are some questions to consider as you read the roadmap:
>>>>
>>>>    1. What do you think of the roadmap overall?
>>>>    2. What would you do to improve our roadmap?
>>>>    3. What do you think of the *levels* of certification outlined in
>>>>    the roadmap?
>>>>    4. Are there any broad *Knowledge Domains and Roles* that we have
>>>>    left off that should be included?
>>>>    5. Do you like our list of *Digital Accessibility* areas of
>>>>    certification? Should we add to or subtract from this list? (For example,
>>>>    one person commented that we should add gaming to the list.)
>>>>    6. Do you like the idea of certifying for these areas separately,
>>>>    in a modular approach as we have done? (See the section on *Referencing
>>>>    IAAP Credentials* for an explanation of how this might work)
>>>>    7. Do you like the 3 year period for certification? Would you make
>>>>    it shorter (2 years) or longer (5 years)?
>>>>    8. What kind of certification assessment would you create? Keep in
>>>>    mind that it has to be a valid and meaningful test of the right kind of
>>>>    competencies, it must be challenging enough that novices could not pass it
>>>>    without first studying or gaining experience,  it must be scalable (not too
>>>>    burdensome to administer or grade/score the assessment), and translatable
>>>>    into other languages.
>>>>    9. Once certification becomes available, do you think you would go
>>>>    through the process to become certified? Why or why not?
>>>>    10. What else should we consider as we move forward?
>>>>
>>>> To give feedback, you can reply directly to this email, or you can send
>>>> an email to the certification committee:
>>>> CC@accessibilityassociation.org
>>>>
>>>> Paul Bohman, PhD
>>>> Chair, IAAP Certification Committee
>>>> Director of Training
>>>> Deque Systems, Inc
>>>> www.deque.com
>>>> 703-225-0380, ext.121
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> J. Albert Bowden II
>>>
>>> jalbertbowden@gmail.com
>>>
>>> http://bowdenweb.com/
>>>
>>>
>>
>
Received on Wednesday, 9 April 2014 15:08:00 UTC

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