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RE: WCAG-ISSUE-42 (Timing Adjustable): Should we fail timing-adjustable when a session times out from inactivity [HTML & ARIA Techniques TF]

From: WebKeyIT <v.conway@webkeyit.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 07:55:45 +0800
To: "'Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Working Group'" <w3c-wai-gl@w3.org>
Message-ID: <002901d005e6$aaeb03d0$00c10b70$@webkeyit.com>
Hi David

I faced this same situation in a recent test.  Firstly, the user was not informed that inactivity would result in a time-out.  Secondly, when using the screen reader and associated keyboard controls such as tab and shift-tab to move around the page, this did not stop the time-out.  It seemed to be limited to alpha/numeric keys only.  We failed them on 2.2.1, but the client could not figure out how to deal with it as they were using telerik controls they couldn't alter.  We had suggested a modal box with a suggestion to press a numeric key, however as the user would be in a form, pressing an alpha/numeric key would cause that key stroke to be entered into the form.  User testers prefer well in excel of the 20 second warning, and users with anxiety-disorder find the whole thing of time-out warnings causes problems.  I'll be interested to hear others thoughts.




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-----Original Message-----
From: Web Content Accessibility Guidelines Working Group Issue Tracker [mailto:sysbot+tracker@w3.org] 
Sent: Saturday, 22 November 2014 5:39 AM
To: w3c-wai-gl@w3.org
Subject: WCAG-ISSUE-42 (Timing Adjustable): Should we fail timing-adjustable when a session times out from inactivity [HTML & ARIA Techniques TF]

WCAG-ISSUE-42 (Timing Adjustable): Should we fail timing-adjustable when a session times out from inactivity [HTML & ARIA Techniques TF]

http://www.w3.org/WAI/GL/track/issues/42

Raised by: David MacDonald
On product: HTML & ARIA Techniques TF

Many sites fail 2.2.1 for timing not adjustable because sessions time out without warning. For remediation, I generally suggest they provide a modal dialogue box with "do you need more time" with Yes/no buttons. However, thinking this through I'm wondering if we should perhaps provide a bit of guidance that this not be a failure in *all* situations. It is one thing to have a time limit on a task... that should have a requirement on 2.2.1.  but a time out from inactivity, perhaps should be treated differently. If the timing is measured on the back end it could be a problem because the person might be working away and the application doesn't know it, then times them out...but if the application is listening to activity in the DOM on the client side, any activity should keep the connection open...Maybe we could consider 2.2.1 met automatically if the listening is happening on the front end, and it keeps the session active as long as there is a reasonable amount of activity.... wondering what other think.
Received on Friday, 21 November 2014 23:56:15 UTC

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